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ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC STUDIES ON NEUROSYPHILIS

ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC STUDIES ON NEUROSYPHILIS Abstract Electroencephalographic study of the human brain has not yet advanced beyond the descriptive stage. Records are described as normal or abnormal depending on their occurrence in normal control subjects or in patients with known pathologic conditions of the central nervous system. The ultimate goal of investigators in this field is to correlate the electroencephalographic patterns with neurophysiologic processes. Progress will come largely through animal experimentation and careful study of the electroencephalographic patterns associated with disorders of the central nervous system in which the location and type of lesions are known. It was with this problem in mind that the present study on neurosyphilis was begun. Furthermore, it is of practical interest to determine whether the electroencephalogram can be of any aid in the diagnosis of neurosyphilis, in the determination of the type of involvement or in the prognosis before or during the course of therapy. MATERIAL This report is a References 1. Gibbs, F. A., and Gibbs, E. L.: Atlas on Electroencephalography , Cambridge, Mass., Lew A. Cummings Co., 1941. 2. Finley, K. H., and Campbell, C. M.: Electroencephalography in Schizophrenia , Am. J. Psychiat. 98:374-381, 1941. 3. Berger, H.: Ueber das Elektrenkephalogram des Menschen: III , Arch. f. Psychiat. 94:16-60, 1931Crossref 4. VI , Berger Arch. f. Psychiat. 99:555, 1933.Crossref 5. Adrian, E. D.; Bishop, G. H.; Davis, H.; Hoagland, H., and Jasper, H. H.: Excitation Phenomena, in Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology , Cold Spring Harbor, L. I., New York, The Biological Laboratory, 1936, vol. 4. 6. Dusser de Barenne, J. G., and McCulloch, W. S.: The Direct Functional Interrelation of Sensory Cortex and Optic Thalamus , J. Neurophysiol. 1:176, 1938. 7. Personal communication to the authors. 8. Lindsley, D. B., and Cutts, K. K.: Clinical and Electroencephalographic Changes in Child During Recovery from Encephalitis , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 45:156-161 ( (Jan.) ) 1941. 9. Gibbs, F. A.: Cortical Frequency Spectra of Schizophrenic, Epileptic and Normal Individuals , Tr. Am. Neurol. A. 65:141, 1939. 10. Finley and Campbell.2 11. Davis, P. A.: The Electroencephalograms of Manic-Depressive Patients , Am. J. Psychiat. 98:430-433, 1941. 12. Finley and Campbell.2 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC STUDIES ON NEUROSYPHILIS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1942 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6754
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290050020002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Electroencephalographic study of the human brain has not yet advanced beyond the descriptive stage. Records are described as normal or abnormal depending on their occurrence in normal control subjects or in patients with known pathologic conditions of the central nervous system. The ultimate goal of investigators in this field is to correlate the electroencephalographic patterns with neurophysiologic processes. Progress will come largely through animal experimentation and careful study of the electroencephalographic patterns associated with disorders of the central nervous system in which the location and type of lesions are known. It was with this problem in mind that the present study on neurosyphilis was begun. Furthermore, it is of practical interest to determine whether the electroencephalogram can be of any aid in the diagnosis of neurosyphilis, in the determination of the type of involvement or in the prognosis before or during the course of therapy. MATERIAL This report is a References 1. Gibbs, F. A., and Gibbs, E. L.: Atlas on Electroencephalography , Cambridge, Mass., Lew A. Cummings Co., 1941. 2. Finley, K. H., and Campbell, C. M.: Electroencephalography in Schizophrenia , Am. J. Psychiat. 98:374-381, 1941. 3. Berger, H.: Ueber das Elektrenkephalogram des Menschen: III , Arch. f. Psychiat. 94:16-60, 1931Crossref 4. VI , Berger Arch. f. Psychiat. 99:555, 1933.Crossref 5. Adrian, E. D.; Bishop, G. H.; Davis, H.; Hoagland, H., and Jasper, H. H.: Excitation Phenomena, in Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology , Cold Spring Harbor, L. I., New York, The Biological Laboratory, 1936, vol. 4. 6. Dusser de Barenne, J. G., and McCulloch, W. S.: The Direct Functional Interrelation of Sensory Cortex and Optic Thalamus , J. Neurophysiol. 1:176, 1938. 7. Personal communication to the authors. 8. Lindsley, D. B., and Cutts, K. K.: Clinical and Electroencephalographic Changes in Child During Recovery from Encephalitis , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 45:156-161 ( (Jan.) ) 1941. 9. Gibbs, F. A.: Cortical Frequency Spectra of Schizophrenic, Epileptic and Normal Individuals , Tr. Am. Neurol. A. 65:141, 1939. 10. Finley and Campbell.2 11. Davis, P. A.: The Electroencephalograms of Manic-Depressive Patients , Am. J. Psychiat. 98:430-433, 1941. 12. Finley and Campbell.2

Journal

Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1942

References