Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Eikenella corrodens: An Unusual Cause of an Indolent Skin Infection

Eikenella corrodens: An Unusual Cause of an Indolent Skin Infection Abstract Eikenella corrodens is a slow-growing, facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacillus that has been recognized as a human pathogen only in recent years.1 The organism is part of the normal flora of the mouth, nasopharynx, bowel, and urogenital tract. It has been cultured from a variety of soft tissue infections, and E corrodens has been grown from pure cultures from subcutaneous abscesses in drug abusers.2,3 We report an unusual indolent skin infection in a drug abuser in which E corrodens was the infectious agent. Report of a Case A 39-year-old man was first seen in July 1980 for a slowly enlarging lesion on the wrist of one-year's duration. It had first appeared as a red papule. The patient denied any trauma to the affected area, but at the time the lesion appeared he had been regularly using intravenous (IV) heroin and methylphenidate. The drug abuse had stopped abruptly 4½ months References 1. Brooks GF: Eikenella corrodens comes of age . South Med J 1976;69:533-534.Crossref 2. Brooks GF, O'Donoghue JM, Rissing JP, et al: Eikenella corrodens, a recently recognized pathogen: Infections in medical surgical patients and in association with methylphenidate abuse . Medicine 1974;53:325-341.Crossref 3. Dorff GJ, Jackson LJ, Rytel MW: Infections with Eikenella corrodens, a newly recognized human pathogen . Ann Intern Med 1974;80:305-309.Crossref 4. Eiken M: Studies on an anaerobic rod-shaped, gram-negative microorganism: Bacteroides corrodens . Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand 1958;43:404-416. 5. Hahn HH, Schweid AI, Beaty HN: Complications of injecting dissolved methylphenidate tablets . Arch Intern Med 1969;123:656-659.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Eikenella corrodens: An Unusual Cause of an Indolent Skin Infection

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/eikenella-corrodens-an-unusual-cause-of-an-indolent-skin-infection-3iPH2m4Pw8
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1983.01650310086021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Eikenella corrodens is a slow-growing, facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacillus that has been recognized as a human pathogen only in recent years.1 The organism is part of the normal flora of the mouth, nasopharynx, bowel, and urogenital tract. It has been cultured from a variety of soft tissue infections, and E corrodens has been grown from pure cultures from subcutaneous abscesses in drug abusers.2,3 We report an unusual indolent skin infection in a drug abuser in which E corrodens was the infectious agent. Report of a Case A 39-year-old man was first seen in July 1980 for a slowly enlarging lesion on the wrist of one-year's duration. It had first appeared as a red papule. The patient denied any trauma to the affected area, but at the time the lesion appeared he had been regularly using intravenous (IV) heroin and methylphenidate. The drug abuse had stopped abruptly 4½ months References 1. Brooks GF: Eikenella corrodens comes of age . South Med J 1976;69:533-534.Crossref 2. Brooks GF, O'Donoghue JM, Rissing JP, et al: Eikenella corrodens, a recently recognized pathogen: Infections in medical surgical patients and in association with methylphenidate abuse . Medicine 1974;53:325-341.Crossref 3. Dorff GJ, Jackson LJ, Rytel MW: Infections with Eikenella corrodens, a newly recognized human pathogen . Ann Intern Med 1974;80:305-309.Crossref 4. Eiken M: Studies on an anaerobic rod-shaped, gram-negative microorganism: Bacteroides corrodens . Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand 1958;43:404-416. 5. Hahn HH, Schweid AI, Beaty HN: Complications of injecting dissolved methylphenidate tablets . Arch Intern Med 1969;123:656-659.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1983

References