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EFFECTS ON THE FETUS OF HYPERVITAMINOSIS D AND CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCY DURING PREGNANCY

EFFECTS ON THE FETUS OF HYPERVITAMINOSIS D AND CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCY DURING PREGNANCY The experiment described in this paper was undertaken in an attempt to shed additional light on the relationship between abnormalities of the intake of minerals and of vitamin D by the mother and the mineralization of the rat fetus. Specifically, we wished to know whether: (1) mineral deficiency of the mother during gestation results in a demonstrable mineral deficiency in the fetus; (2) maternal mineral deficiency not severe enough to show osteoporosis in a roentgenogram could affect fetal mineral metabolism; (3) demineralizing effects of hypervitaminosis D, such as those observed by Harris in young rats on a diet low in calcium and phosphorus, were apparent in the offspring of rat mothers who were similarly maintained; (4) vitamin D in therapeutic doses administered to pregnant rats being maintained on a diet deficient in calcium and phosphorus would change materially the mineral content of the fetus. The effects on the developing fetus http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

EFFECTS ON THE FETUS OF HYPERVITAMINOSIS D AND CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCY DURING PREGNANCY

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1936 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970140066007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The experiment described in this paper was undertaken in an attempt to shed additional light on the relationship between abnormalities of the intake of minerals and of vitamin D by the mother and the mineralization of the rat fetus. Specifically, we wished to know whether: (1) mineral deficiency of the mother during gestation results in a demonstrable mineral deficiency in the fetus; (2) maternal mineral deficiency not severe enough to show osteoporosis in a roentgenogram could affect fetal mineral metabolism; (3) demineralizing effects of hypervitaminosis D, such as those observed by Harris in young rats on a diet low in calcium and phosphorus, were apparent in the offspring of rat mothers who were similarly maintained; (4) vitamin D in therapeutic doses administered to pregnant rats being maintained on a diet deficient in calcium and phosphorus would change materially the mineral content of the fetus. The effects on the developing fetus

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1936

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