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EFFECTS AND FATE OF BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS IN NORMAL DOGS

EFFECTS AND FATE OF BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS IN NORMAL DOGS Abstract IN MANY types of shock the use of blood transfusions is a time-honored method of attempting to correct the presumed disparity between the volume of circulating blood and the capacity of the vascular bed. Although considerable work has been done studying the effects of blood transfusions and other intravenously administered fluids in the treatment of shock, there is an incomplete understanding of what happens when a blood transfusion is given to a normal person or animal. Boycott and Oakley1 stated that after a transfusion of whole blood in dogs the plasma volume returns to normal in two to three days and the blood volume is increased for at least two days in proportion to the volume of red cells added. They also reported that the injected protein disappears from the blood stream within the same period. Krumbhaar and Chanutin2 have reported similar results. According to Sibley and Lundy, References 1. Boycott, A. E., and Oakley, C. L.: The Adjustment of Blood Volume after Transfusion , J. Path. & Bact. 38:91, 1934. 2. Krumbhaar, E. B., and Chanutin, A.: Studies in Experimental Plethora in Dogs and Rabbits , J. Exper. Med. 35:847, 1935. 3. Sibley, H. L., and Lundy, L. S.: The Blood Volume and Hemoglobin after Transfusion , Surg., Gynec. & Obst. 67:490, 1938. 4. Evelyn, K. A., and Mallory, H. T.: Micro-Method for the Determination of Oxyhemoglobin, Methemoglobin and Sulfhemoglobin, in a Single Sample of Blood , J. Biol. Chem. 126:655, 1938. 5. Barbour, H. G., and Hamilton, W. F.: The Falling Drop Method for Determining Specific Gravity , J. Biol. Chem. 69:625, 1946. 6. Price, P. B., and Longmire, W. P.: The Use of T-1824 in Plasma Volume Determinations , Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 71:51, 1942. 7. Price, P. B.; Hanlon, C. R.; Longmire, W. P., and Metcalf, W.: Experimental Shock: I. Effects of Acute Hemorrhage in Healthy Dogs , Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 69:327, 1941. 8. Metcalf, W.: The Fate and Effects of Transfused Serum or Plasma in Normal Dogs , J. Clin. Invest. 23:403, 1944. 9. Notes on Operation of Evelyn Photoelectric Colorimeter , Philadelphia, Rubicon, 1939. 10. Peters, J. P., and Van Slyke, G. D.: Qualitative Clinical Chemistry , Baltimore, (Williams & Wilkins Company), 1932. 11. Ebert, R. V., and Stead, E. A.: Demonstration That in Normal Man No Reserves of Blood Are Mobilized by Exercise, Epinephrine and Hemorrhage , Am. J. M. Sc. 201:655, 1941. 12. Callender, S. T.; Powell, E. O., and Witts, L. J.: Life-Span of Red Cells in Man , J. Path. & Bact. 57:129, 1945. 13. Howland, J. W., and Hawkins, W. B.: Protein Metabolism. Protein Interchange and Utilization in Phlorizinized Dogs , J. Biol. Chem. 123:99, 1938. 14. Calvin, D. B.; Decherd, G., and Herrmann, G.: Plasma Protein Shifts During Diuresis , Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol. & Med. 44:578, 1940. 15. Beatie, J., and Collard, H. B.: Plasma Protein Storage , Brit. M. J. 2:507, 1942. 16. Madden, S. C., and Whipple, G. H.: Plasma Proteins, Their Service, Production and Utilization , Physiol. Rev. 20:194, 1940. 17. Holman, R. L.; Mahoney, E. B., and Whipple, G. H.: Plasma Protein Regeneration Controlled by Diet ., J. Exper. Med. 59:251, 1934. 18. Seavers, R., and Price, P. B.: Effects of Sublethal Hemorrhage in Normal Dogs and in Dogs Previously Transfused with Whole Blood , Surg., Gynec. & Obst. 88:178-184, 1949. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

EFFECTS AND FATE OF BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS IN NORMAL DOGS

Archives of Surgery , Volume 59 (2) – Aug 1, 1949

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1949 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240040280010
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract IN MANY types of shock the use of blood transfusions is a time-honored method of attempting to correct the presumed disparity between the volume of circulating blood and the capacity of the vascular bed. Although considerable work has been done studying the effects of blood transfusions and other intravenously administered fluids in the treatment of shock, there is an incomplete understanding of what happens when a blood transfusion is given to a normal person or animal. Boycott and Oakley1 stated that after a transfusion of whole blood in dogs the plasma volume returns to normal in two to three days and the blood volume is increased for at least two days in proportion to the volume of red cells added. They also reported that the injected protein disappears from the blood stream within the same period. Krumbhaar and Chanutin2 have reported similar results. According to Sibley and Lundy, References 1. Boycott, A. E., and Oakley, C. L.: The Adjustment of Blood Volume after Transfusion , J. Path. & Bact. 38:91, 1934. 2. Krumbhaar, E. B., and Chanutin, A.: Studies in Experimental Plethora in Dogs and Rabbits , J. Exper. Med. 35:847, 1935. 3. Sibley, H. L., and Lundy, L. S.: The Blood Volume and Hemoglobin after Transfusion , Surg., Gynec. & Obst. 67:490, 1938. 4. Evelyn, K. A., and Mallory, H. T.: Micro-Method for the Determination of Oxyhemoglobin, Methemoglobin and Sulfhemoglobin, in a Single Sample of Blood , J. Biol. Chem. 126:655, 1938. 5. Barbour, H. G., and Hamilton, W. F.: The Falling Drop Method for Determining Specific Gravity , J. Biol. Chem. 69:625, 1946. 6. Price, P. B., and Longmire, W. P.: The Use of T-1824 in Plasma Volume Determinations , Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 71:51, 1942. 7. Price, P. B.; Hanlon, C. R.; Longmire, W. P., and Metcalf, W.: Experimental Shock: I. Effects of Acute Hemorrhage in Healthy Dogs , Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 69:327, 1941. 8. Metcalf, W.: The Fate and Effects of Transfused Serum or Plasma in Normal Dogs , J. Clin. Invest. 23:403, 1944. 9. Notes on Operation of Evelyn Photoelectric Colorimeter , Philadelphia, Rubicon, 1939. 10. Peters, J. P., and Van Slyke, G. D.: Qualitative Clinical Chemistry , Baltimore, (Williams & Wilkins Company), 1932. 11. Ebert, R. V., and Stead, E. A.: Demonstration That in Normal Man No Reserves of Blood Are Mobilized by Exercise, Epinephrine and Hemorrhage , Am. J. M. Sc. 201:655, 1941. 12. Callender, S. T.; Powell, E. O., and Witts, L. J.: Life-Span of Red Cells in Man , J. Path. & Bact. 57:129, 1945. 13. Howland, J. W., and Hawkins, W. B.: Protein Metabolism. Protein Interchange and Utilization in Phlorizinized Dogs , J. Biol. Chem. 123:99, 1938. 14. Calvin, D. B.; Decherd, G., and Herrmann, G.: Plasma Protein Shifts During Diuresis , Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol. & Med. 44:578, 1940. 15. Beatie, J., and Collard, H. B.: Plasma Protein Storage , Brit. M. J. 2:507, 1942. 16. Madden, S. C., and Whipple, G. H.: Plasma Proteins, Their Service, Production and Utilization , Physiol. Rev. 20:194, 1940. 17. Holman, R. L.; Mahoney, E. B., and Whipple, G. H.: Plasma Protein Regeneration Controlled by Diet ., J. Exper. Med. 59:251, 1934. 18. Seavers, R., and Price, P. B.: Effects of Sublethal Hemorrhage in Normal Dogs and in Dogs Previously Transfused with Whole Blood , Surg., Gynec. & Obst. 88:178-184, 1949.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1949

References