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Effect of Topical Application of Glycine and Proline on Recalcitrant Leg Ulcers of Prolidase Deficiency

Effect of Topical Application of Glycine and Proline on Recalcitrant Leg Ulcers of Prolidase... Abstract To the Editor.— The most important dermatologic problem of prolidase deficiency1 is chronic recurrent leg ulcers that are recalcitrant in healing. We used 5% glycine-5% proline ointment on leg ulcers with excellent results. Report of a Case.— The patient, now a 22-year-old woman, is the same patient as described previously.1 She had never been free of recalcitrant leg ulcers despite various conventional therapies including topical application of antibiotics (gentamicin sulfate, colistin sulfate, polymyxin B sulfate, etc), leg bath in 0.01% potassium permanganate solution, oral administration of zinc sulfate (180 mg daily), and/or ascorbic acid (3 g daily). Oral L-proline (1 g daily) was also tried for two months with no apparent benefit. We decided to use topical proline and then a combination of topical proline and glycine on her leg ulcers. L-proline and/or L-glycine ground with a mortar and pestle was mixed in liquid paraffin (30 g) and References 1. Arata J, Umemura S, Yamamoto Y, et al: Prolidase deficiency: Its dermatological manifestation and some additional biochemical studies . Arch Dermatol 1979;115:62-67.Crossref 2. Jackson SH, Dennis AW, Greenberg M: Iminodipeptiduria: A genetic defect in recycling collagen: A method for determining prolidase in erythrocytes . Can Med Assoc J 1975;113:759-763. 3. Ogata A, Tanaka S, Tomoda T, et al: Autosomal recessive prolidase deficiency: Three patients with recalcitrant leg ulcers . Arch Dermatol 1981;117:689-694.Crossref 4. Isemura M, Hanyu T, Gejyo F, et al: Prolidase deficiency with imidodipeptiduria: A familial case with and without clinical symptoms . Clin Chim Acta 1979;93:401-407.Crossref 5. Sheffield LJ, Schlesinger P, Faull K, et al: Iminopeptiduria, skin ulcerations, and edema in a boy with prolidase deficiency . J Pediatr 1977;91:578-583.Crossref 6. Pedersen PS, Christensen E, Brandt NJ: Prolidase deficiency . Acta Paediatr Scand 1983;72:785-788.Crossref 7. Jackson SH, Heininger JA: Proline recycling during collagen metabolism as determined by concurrent 18O2- and 3H-labelling . Biochim Biophys Acta 1975;381:359-367.Crossref 8. Jackson SH, Heininger JA: A study of collagen reutilization using an 18O2-labelling technique . Clin Chim Acta 1974;51:163-171.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Effect of Topical Application of Glycine and Proline on Recalcitrant Leg Ulcers of Prolidase Deficiency

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1986.01660180026006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— The most important dermatologic problem of prolidase deficiency1 is chronic recurrent leg ulcers that are recalcitrant in healing. We used 5% glycine-5% proline ointment on leg ulcers with excellent results. Report of a Case.— The patient, now a 22-year-old woman, is the same patient as described previously.1 She had never been free of recalcitrant leg ulcers despite various conventional therapies including topical application of antibiotics (gentamicin sulfate, colistin sulfate, polymyxin B sulfate, etc), leg bath in 0.01% potassium permanganate solution, oral administration of zinc sulfate (180 mg daily), and/or ascorbic acid (3 g daily). Oral L-proline (1 g daily) was also tried for two months with no apparent benefit. We decided to use topical proline and then a combination of topical proline and glycine on her leg ulcers. L-proline and/or L-glycine ground with a mortar and pestle was mixed in liquid paraffin (30 g) and References 1. Arata J, Umemura S, Yamamoto Y, et al: Prolidase deficiency: Its dermatological manifestation and some additional biochemical studies . Arch Dermatol 1979;115:62-67.Crossref 2. Jackson SH, Dennis AW, Greenberg M: Iminodipeptiduria: A genetic defect in recycling collagen: A method for determining prolidase in erythrocytes . Can Med Assoc J 1975;113:759-763. 3. Ogata A, Tanaka S, Tomoda T, et al: Autosomal recessive prolidase deficiency: Three patients with recalcitrant leg ulcers . Arch Dermatol 1981;117:689-694.Crossref 4. Isemura M, Hanyu T, Gejyo F, et al: Prolidase deficiency with imidodipeptiduria: A familial case with and without clinical symptoms . Clin Chim Acta 1979;93:401-407.Crossref 5. Sheffield LJ, Schlesinger P, Faull K, et al: Iminopeptiduria, skin ulcerations, and edema in a boy with prolidase deficiency . J Pediatr 1977;91:578-583.Crossref 6. Pedersen PS, Christensen E, Brandt NJ: Prolidase deficiency . Acta Paediatr Scand 1983;72:785-788.Crossref 7. Jackson SH, Heininger JA: Proline recycling during collagen metabolism as determined by concurrent 18O2- and 3H-labelling . Biochim Biophys Acta 1975;381:359-367.Crossref 8. Jackson SH, Heininger JA: A study of collagen reutilization using an 18O2-labelling technique . Clin Chim Acta 1974;51:163-171.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1986

References