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Effect of Third Cranial Nerve on Intraocular Pressure

Effect of Third Cranial Nerve on Intraocular Pressure Abstract Introduction The factors responsible for the precise control of the ocular pressure remain an enigma despite extensive research concerning the various neural, vascular, hormonal, humoral, and local mechanical influences. While much interest in the effect of ocular innervation upon intraocular pressure is apparent in the literature, no adequate demonstrations have been made of any sustained controlling influence.The influence of the third cranial nerve and the parasympathetic outflow to the eye upon ocular hydrodynamics is somewhat confused despite the well-known effects of the various parasympathomimetic drugs. Schmerl and Steinberg (1949),1 in one of a series of interesting experiments in rabbits, concluded that faradic stimulation in the region of the ciliary ganglion resulted, among other things, in an elevation in the ocular pressure. Perhaps more significantly, they noted a fall in the ocular pressure when destructive currents were applied in the same area. On occasion, this latter effect lasted for References 1. Schmerl, E., and Steinberg, B.: Role of Ciliary and Superior Cervical Ganglia in Ocular Tension , Amer J Ophthal 32:947, 1949. 2. Schmerl, E., and Steinberg, B.: Separation of Diencephalic Centers Concerned With Pupillary Motility and Ocular Tension , Amer J Ophthal 33:1379, 1950. 3. Greaves, D. P., and Perkins, E. S.: Influence of Third Cranial Nerve on Intraocular Pressure , Brit J Ophthal 37:54, 1953.Crossref 4. Purnell, E. W.; Melton, C. E.; and Adams, E.: Effects of Nerve Stimulation on Aqueous Outflow in Enucleated Eyes , Amer J Ophthal 42:182, 1956. 5. Armaly, M. F.: Studies on Intraocular Effects of Orbital Parasympathetic Pathway: III. Effect on Steady-State Dynamics , AMA Arch Ophthal 62:817, 1959.Crossref 6. Von Sallmann, L., and Lowenstein, O.: Responses of Intraocular Pressure, Blood Pressure, and Cutaneous Vessels to Electric Stimulation in Diencephalon , Amer J Ophthal 39:11, 1955. 7. Gloster, J., and Greaves, D. F.: Effect of Diencephalic Stimulation Upon Intraocular Pressure , Brit J Ophthal 41:513, 1957.Crossref 8. Grant, W. M., and English, F. P.: Explanation for So-Called Consensual Pressure Drop During Tonography , Arch Ophthal 69:314, 1963.Crossref 9. Gloster, J.: Influence of Facial Nerve on Intraocular Pressure , Brit J Ophthal 45:259, 1961.Crossref 10. Bárány, E. H.: Transient Increase in Outflow Facility After Superior Cervical Ganglionectomy in Rabbits , Arch Ophthal 67:303, 1962.Crossref 11. Ambache, N.: Use and Limitations of Atropine for Pharmacological Studies on Autonomic Effectors , Pharmacol Rev 7:467, 1955. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Effect of Third Cranial Nerve on Intraocular Pressure

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 72 (4) – Oct 1, 1964

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1964 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1964.00970020529018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Introduction The factors responsible for the precise control of the ocular pressure remain an enigma despite extensive research concerning the various neural, vascular, hormonal, humoral, and local mechanical influences. While much interest in the effect of ocular innervation upon intraocular pressure is apparent in the literature, no adequate demonstrations have been made of any sustained controlling influence.The influence of the third cranial nerve and the parasympathetic outflow to the eye upon ocular hydrodynamics is somewhat confused despite the well-known effects of the various parasympathomimetic drugs. Schmerl and Steinberg (1949),1 in one of a series of interesting experiments in rabbits, concluded that faradic stimulation in the region of the ciliary ganglion resulted, among other things, in an elevation in the ocular pressure. Perhaps more significantly, they noted a fall in the ocular pressure when destructive currents were applied in the same area. On occasion, this latter effect lasted for References 1. Schmerl, E., and Steinberg, B.: Role of Ciliary and Superior Cervical Ganglia in Ocular Tension , Amer J Ophthal 32:947, 1949. 2. Schmerl, E., and Steinberg, B.: Separation of Diencephalic Centers Concerned With Pupillary Motility and Ocular Tension , Amer J Ophthal 33:1379, 1950. 3. Greaves, D. P., and Perkins, E. S.: Influence of Third Cranial Nerve on Intraocular Pressure , Brit J Ophthal 37:54, 1953.Crossref 4. Purnell, E. W.; Melton, C. E.; and Adams, E.: Effects of Nerve Stimulation on Aqueous Outflow in Enucleated Eyes , Amer J Ophthal 42:182, 1956. 5. Armaly, M. F.: Studies on Intraocular Effects of Orbital Parasympathetic Pathway: III. Effect on Steady-State Dynamics , AMA Arch Ophthal 62:817, 1959.Crossref 6. Von Sallmann, L., and Lowenstein, O.: Responses of Intraocular Pressure, Blood Pressure, and Cutaneous Vessels to Electric Stimulation in Diencephalon , Amer J Ophthal 39:11, 1955. 7. Gloster, J., and Greaves, D. F.: Effect of Diencephalic Stimulation Upon Intraocular Pressure , Brit J Ophthal 41:513, 1957.Crossref 8. Grant, W. M., and English, F. P.: Explanation for So-Called Consensual Pressure Drop During Tonography , Arch Ophthal 69:314, 1963.Crossref 9. Gloster, J.: Influence of Facial Nerve on Intraocular Pressure , Brit J Ophthal 45:259, 1961.Crossref 10. Bárány, E. H.: Transient Increase in Outflow Facility After Superior Cervical Ganglionectomy in Rabbits , Arch Ophthal 67:303, 1962.Crossref 11. Ambache, N.: Use and Limitations of Atropine for Pharmacological Studies on Autonomic Effectors , Pharmacol Rev 7:467, 1955.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1964

References

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