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Editorial Footnote

Editorial Footnote he article by Rosbe et al presents us with a novel and challenging concept: using a telephone interview instead of an office visit for the traditional postoperative follow-up for simple surgical procedures, such as adenotonsillectomy. T There is a contemporary logic to this idea, yet I suspect that it will be troubling for many surgeons. The goal of this commentary is to explore the soundness of this proposal and to gain some insight as to why the surgical community may resist its implementation. In their introduction, the authors state that “In recent years, the changing health-care environment has forced hospitals and third-party payers to cut costs and payments for these procedures.” It is these cost-cutting measures that prompted their study. However, in most circumstances, there is no service charge for the initial postoperative visit, since the cost of the follow-up evaluation is included in the operative fee. In reality, eliminating the one-time postoperative visit actually pro- vides cost savings not to hospitals or to third-party payers, but to the surgeons who did the procedure. The tradition of our training and the values of our medical culture do not predispose us to view the physician-patient relationship simply as an economic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

Editorial Footnote

Abstract

he article by Rosbe et al presents us with a novel and challenging concept: using a telephone interview instead of an office visit for the traditional postoperative follow-up for simple surgical procedures, such as adenotonsillectomy. T There is a contemporary logic to this idea, yet I suspect that it will be troubling for many surgeons. The goal of this commentary is to explore the soundness of this proposal and to gain some insight as to why the surgical community may resist its...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2000 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6181
eISSN
2168-619X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.126.6.722
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

he article by Rosbe et al presents us with a novel and challenging concept: using a telephone interview instead of an office visit for the traditional postoperative follow-up for simple surgical procedures, such as adenotonsillectomy. T There is a contemporary logic to this idea, yet I suspect that it will be troubling for many surgeons. The goal of this commentary is to explore the soundness of this proposal and to gain some insight as to why the surgical community may resist its implementation. In their introduction, the authors state that “In recent years, the changing health-care environment has forced hospitals and third-party payers to cut costs and payments for these procedures.” It is these cost-cutting measures that prompted their study. However, in most circumstances, there is no service charge for the initial postoperative visit, since the cost of the follow-up evaluation is included in the operative fee. In reality, eliminating the one-time postoperative visit actually pro- vides cost savings not to hospitals or to third-party payers, but to the surgeons who did the procedure. The tradition of our training and the values of our medical culture do not predispose us to view the physician-patient relationship simply as an economic

Journal

JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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