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Dysmorphism Leading to a Diagnosis of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Dysmorphism Leading to a Diagnosis of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Abstract Sir.—I am a practicing pediatrician in an inner-city hospital outpatient clinic. Recently, a 2-year-old patient presented for a routine checkup. On visual inspection of this child, I noted growth failure; microcephaly, with a prominent forehead; a flat nasal bridge; and downward slanting of her eyes. Having just read the study of Marion et al,1 I was very suspicious of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) infection in this patient. Her medical history was suspect for intrauterine infection and was remarkable for a greater-than-average number of pediatric ailments, including one episode of pneumonia. The patient at the time of this visit was asymptomatic. Some baseline studies were done that showed lymphopenia, a reticulonodular pattern on chest roentgenogram, and positive HTLV-III antibodies in the patient's sera. Although this patient did not manifest full expression of HTLV-III embryopathy, she presented with a substantial number of features to prompt further investigation. References 1. Marion R, Wiznia A, Hutcheon RG, et al: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) embryopathy . AJDC 1986;140: 638-640. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Dysmorphism Leading to a Diagnosis of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Dysmorphism Leading to a Diagnosis of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—I am a practicing pediatrician in an inner-city hospital outpatient clinic. Recently, a 2-year-old patient presented for a routine checkup. On visual inspection of this child, I noted growth failure; microcephaly, with a prominent forehead; a flat nasal bridge; and downward slanting of her eyes. Having just read the study of Marion et al,1 I was very suspicious of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) infection in this patient. Her medical history was suspect...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460050016003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—I am a practicing pediatrician in an inner-city hospital outpatient clinic. Recently, a 2-year-old patient presented for a routine checkup. On visual inspection of this child, I noted growth failure; microcephaly, with a prominent forehead; a flat nasal bridge; and downward slanting of her eyes. Having just read the study of Marion et al,1 I was very suspicious of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) infection in this patient. Her medical history was suspect for intrauterine infection and was remarkable for a greater-than-average number of pediatric ailments, including one episode of pneumonia. The patient at the time of this visit was asymptomatic. Some baseline studies were done that showed lymphopenia, a reticulonodular pattern on chest roentgenogram, and positive HTLV-III antibodies in the patient's sera. Although this patient did not manifest full expression of HTLV-III embryopathy, she presented with a substantial number of features to prompt further investigation. References 1. Marion R, Wiznia A, Hutcheon RG, et al: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) embryopathy . AJDC 1986;140: 638-640.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1987

References

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