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Dr Waltman Walters

Dr Waltman Walters DR WALTMAN Walters was editor of Archives of Surgery from 1938 to 1962, except for 1943 to 1945, when he was on active duty in the US Navy. During this period, Dr Lester Dragstedt served as editor pro tem. In 1955, Walters received the honor award of the American Medical Writers Association for "accuracy, clarity, conciseness, and newness of information; for excellence of design, printing, and illustrations; and for distinguished service to the medical profession" as editor in chief of Archives of Surgery. After graduation from Rush Medical College in 1920, Walters came to the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minn, for specialty training in general surgery. While still in residency, he married Dr Will Mayo's younger daughter, Phoebe. It was a happy marriage and friendship that lasted more than 60 years until Walters' death at 93 years of age. In 1923, he finished his residency in general surgery at the Mayo Foundation and received his master's of science in surgery from the University of Minnesota. Walters was appointed to the staff of the Mayo Clinic on October 1, 1924, as head of the section of surgery and as instructor in surgery in the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. He progressed on the academic ladder to professor of surgery in 1936. Walters contributed more than 400 papers, chapters, and other works to the medical and surgical literature. In addition to being editor of Archives of Surgery, he was editor of Lewis-Walters' Practice of Surgery from 1941 to 1960. He was author or coauthor of books on obstructive jaundice, diseases of the gallbladder and bile ducts, and carcinoma and other malignant lesions of the stomach. In addition to gastrointestinal surgery, he was certified in urologic surgery and performed appropriate operations in this field. He was a true professional and a true gentleman, approaching medicine as a team member and taking counsel from his colleagues just as they took counsel from him. Neither vain nor egocentric, he took international acclaim in stride with the humility befitting a man whose achievements speak for themselves. He was a dedicated educator of surgeons. Walters was a stern mentor and a hard taskmaster but never demanded any more from his residents than he required of himself. Although Walters was a taskmaster in the operating room, out of surgery he was friendly and always helpful to his residents and assistants. He was very helpful in aiding residents who were finishing their programs and making plans for future practice and location. If a resident was not performing well during an operation, Walters would tell the resident to look at the sign always posted in his operating room that said "THINK," and to stand there until he recognized its meaning. During a long operation, there is always some shifting of feet under the operating table, and Walters would sometimes step on an assistant's foot. Walters' comment was always, "You are standing under my foot." Walters was always frank about the performance of a resident. If the resident was not consistently doing well, he would tell him, "You have thin skin. As a surgeon you need the skin of an elephant, as I have." Possibly, he would direct him into another specialty. Walters' reputation among his physician colleagues was that if you had a patient with an abdominal problem, Walters was the surgeon to call. Walters gave a considerable amount of time furthering international friendships and good relations among physicians and surgeons. He was a dedicated educator of surgeons, and he trained a cadre of graduate students of the Mayo Foundation in techniques for which he was well-known. He led them to the thresholds of successful careers in training others and establishing prominent practices of their own. In addition to his professional practice, he served the Mayo Clinic and Foundation well for many years on the board of governors of the clinic and board of trustees of the foundation. He was a good golfer and with Mrs Walters enjoyed their boat on the Mississippi River, she serving as the captain and he as first mate. He was a member of the US Navy Reserves, was on active duty during World War II, and rose to the grade of rear admiral by the end of the war. His rare vision still challenges the surgeons of tomorrow. He was a surgeon, a scientist, and lover of humanity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Dr Waltman Walters

Archives of Surgery , Volume 136 (4) – Apr 1, 2001

Dr Waltman Walters

Abstract

DR WALTMAN Walters was editor of Archives of Surgery from 1938 to 1962, except for 1943 to 1945, when he was on active duty in the US Navy. During this period, Dr Lester Dragstedt served as editor pro tem. In 1955, Walters received the honor award of the American Medical Writers Association for "accuracy, clarity, conciseness, and newness of information; for excellence of design, printing, and illustrations; and for distinguished service to the medical profession" as editor in chief...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.136.4.478
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DR WALTMAN Walters was editor of Archives of Surgery from 1938 to 1962, except for 1943 to 1945, when he was on active duty in the US Navy. During this period, Dr Lester Dragstedt served as editor pro tem. In 1955, Walters received the honor award of the American Medical Writers Association for "accuracy, clarity, conciseness, and newness of information; for excellence of design, printing, and illustrations; and for distinguished service to the medical profession" as editor in chief of Archives of Surgery. After graduation from Rush Medical College in 1920, Walters came to the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minn, for specialty training in general surgery. While still in residency, he married Dr Will Mayo's younger daughter, Phoebe. It was a happy marriage and friendship that lasted more than 60 years until Walters' death at 93 years of age. In 1923, he finished his residency in general surgery at the Mayo Foundation and received his master's of science in surgery from the University of Minnesota. Walters was appointed to the staff of the Mayo Clinic on October 1, 1924, as head of the section of surgery and as instructor in surgery in the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. He progressed on the academic ladder to professor of surgery in 1936. Walters contributed more than 400 papers, chapters, and other works to the medical and surgical literature. In addition to being editor of Archives of Surgery, he was editor of Lewis-Walters' Practice of Surgery from 1941 to 1960. He was author or coauthor of books on obstructive jaundice, diseases of the gallbladder and bile ducts, and carcinoma and other malignant lesions of the stomach. In addition to gastrointestinal surgery, he was certified in urologic surgery and performed appropriate operations in this field. He was a true professional and a true gentleman, approaching medicine as a team member and taking counsel from his colleagues just as they took counsel from him. Neither vain nor egocentric, he took international acclaim in stride with the humility befitting a man whose achievements speak for themselves. He was a dedicated educator of surgeons. Walters was a stern mentor and a hard taskmaster but never demanded any more from his residents than he required of himself. Although Walters was a taskmaster in the operating room, out of surgery he was friendly and always helpful to his residents and assistants. He was very helpful in aiding residents who were finishing their programs and making plans for future practice and location. If a resident was not performing well during an operation, Walters would tell the resident to look at the sign always posted in his operating room that said "THINK," and to stand there until he recognized its meaning. During a long operation, there is always some shifting of feet under the operating table, and Walters would sometimes step on an assistant's foot. Walters' comment was always, "You are standing under my foot." Walters was always frank about the performance of a resident. If the resident was not consistently doing well, he would tell him, "You have thin skin. As a surgeon you need the skin of an elephant, as I have." Possibly, he would direct him into another specialty. Walters' reputation among his physician colleagues was that if you had a patient with an abdominal problem, Walters was the surgeon to call. Walters gave a considerable amount of time furthering international friendships and good relations among physicians and surgeons. He was a dedicated educator of surgeons, and he trained a cadre of graduate students of the Mayo Foundation in techniques for which he was well-known. He led them to the thresholds of successful careers in training others and establishing prominent practices of their own. In addition to his professional practice, he served the Mayo Clinic and Foundation well for many years on the board of governors of the clinic and board of trustees of the foundation. He was a good golfer and with Mrs Walters enjoyed their boat on the Mississippi River, she serving as the captain and he as first mate. He was a member of the US Navy Reserves, was on active duty during World War II, and rose to the grade of rear admiral by the end of the war. His rare vision still challenges the surgeons of tomorrow. He was a surgeon, a scientist, and lover of humanity.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 2001

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