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Dominant Exudative Vitreoretinopathy and Other Vascular Developmental Disorders of the Peripheral Retina

Dominant Exudative Vitreoretinopathy and Other Vascular Developmental Disorders of the Peripheral... This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Dominant exudative vitreoretinopathy (DEVR) is a rare ocular condition involving the vitreous and retina. Syneresis and liquefaction of the vitreous, preretinal membranes, and delicate white opacities represent the most common changes in the vitreous. Alterations in the retina include heterotopia of the macula, retinal neovascularization, subretinal and intraretinal exudation, and localized retinal detachment. Abrupt termination of the retinal vasculature in the temporal equatorial zone and nonperfusion of the peripheral retina are the most common findings and can be demonstrated by fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Although DEVR bears a resemblance to the retinopathy of prematurity, it has an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and is not associated with premature birth or postnatal oxygen treatment. Myopia is common in both diseases. This monograph is divided into three parts. Part 1 includes a brief description of the normal development and the anatomy of the peripheral retinal vasculature. Disturbances in the development of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Dominant Exudative Vitreoretinopathy and Other Vascular Developmental Disorders of the Peripheral Retina

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 101 (3) – Mar 1, 1983

Dominant Exudative Vitreoretinopathy and Other Vascular Developmental Disorders of the Peripheral Retina

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Dominant exudative vitreoretinopathy (DEVR) is a rare ocular condition involving the vitreous and retina. Syneresis and liquefaction of the vitreous, preretinal membranes, and delicate white opacities represent the most common changes in the vitreous. Alterations in the retina include heterotopia of the macula, retinal neovascularization, subretinal...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1983.01040010498050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Dominant exudative vitreoretinopathy (DEVR) is a rare ocular condition involving the vitreous and retina. Syneresis and liquefaction of the vitreous, preretinal membranes, and delicate white opacities represent the most common changes in the vitreous. Alterations in the retina include heterotopia of the macula, retinal neovascularization, subretinal and intraretinal exudation, and localized retinal detachment. Abrupt termination of the retinal vasculature in the temporal equatorial zone and nonperfusion of the peripheral retina are the most common findings and can be demonstrated by fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Although DEVR bears a resemblance to the retinopathy of prematurity, it has an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and is not associated with premature birth or postnatal oxygen treatment. Myopia is common in both diseases. This monograph is divided into three parts. Part 1 includes a brief description of the normal development and the anatomy of the peripheral retinal vasculature. Disturbances in the development of

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1983

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