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Does This Patient Have Delirium?

Does This Patient Have Delirium? THE RATIONAL CLINICIAN’S CORNER CLINICAL EXAMINATION Value of Bedside Instruments Camilla L. Wong, MD, MHSc, FRCPC Context Delirium occurs in many hospitalized older patients and has serious conse- Jayna Holroyd-Leduc, MD, FRCPC quences including increased risk for death and admission to long-term care. Despite its importance, health care clinicians often fail to recognize delirium. Simple bedside David L. Simel, MD, MHS instruments may lead to improved identification. Sharon E. Straus, MD, MSc, FRCPC Objective To systematically review the evidence on the accuracy of bedside instru- ments in diagnosing the presence of delirium in adults. CLINICAL SCENARIO Data Sources Search of MEDLINE (from 1950 to May 2010), EMBASE (from 1980 to An 85-year-old man with non–small cell May 2010), and references of retrieved articles to identify studies of delirium among in- lung cancer was admitted yesterday to patients. the oncology ward for treatment of Study Selection Prospective studies of diagnostic accuracy that compared at least pneumonia. He started antibiotics and 1 delirium bedside instrument to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Dis- supplemental oxygen. Prior to hospi- orders–based diagnosis made by a geriatrician, psychiatrist, or neurologist. talization, he lived independently in the Data Synthesis There were 6570 unique citations http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2010 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2010.1182
pmid
20716741
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE RATIONAL CLINICIAN’S CORNER CLINICAL EXAMINATION Value of Bedside Instruments Camilla L. Wong, MD, MHSc, FRCPC Context Delirium occurs in many hospitalized older patients and has serious conse- Jayna Holroyd-Leduc, MD, FRCPC quences including increased risk for death and admission to long-term care. Despite its importance, health care clinicians often fail to recognize delirium. Simple bedside David L. Simel, MD, MHS instruments may lead to improved identification. Sharon E. Straus, MD, MSc, FRCPC Objective To systematically review the evidence on the accuracy of bedside instru- ments in diagnosing the presence of delirium in adults. CLINICAL SCENARIO Data Sources Search of MEDLINE (from 1950 to May 2010), EMBASE (from 1980 to An 85-year-old man with non–small cell May 2010), and references of retrieved articles to identify studies of delirium among in- lung cancer was admitted yesterday to patients. the oncology ward for treatment of Study Selection Prospective studies of diagnostic accuracy that compared at least pneumonia. He started antibiotics and 1 delirium bedside instrument to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Dis- supplemental oxygen. Prior to hospi- orders–based diagnosis made by a geriatrician, psychiatrist, or neurologist. talization, he lived independently in the Data Synthesis There were 6570 unique citations

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 18, 2010

References