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DOES NOT TAKE A JOKE.

DOES NOT TAKE A JOKE. An English medical statistician, in reporting on the mortality of his district, for 1899, took the occasion to suggest that the predominance of male births was influenced by the patriotic enthusiasm aroused by the present war. This was apparently offered as a facetious comment and it was accepted as such by the council receiving the report. Our British contemporary1 that gives us the item does not appear to take it kindly as such. It not only ironically congratulates the council on its sense of humor, but gravely proceeds to remark that the figures are too small to afford any sound conclusions, and that a still greater fallacy is involved since it is impossible to suppose that maternal patriotic zeal could have affected the sex of unborn children in the last two or three months of pregnancy. Hence it says: "absurdities of this kind will do nothing to advance the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

DOES NOT TAKE A JOKE.

JAMA , Volume XXXIV (21) – May 26, 1900

DOES NOT TAKE A JOKE.

Abstract


An English medical statistician, in reporting on the mortality of his district, for 1899, took the occasion to suggest that the predominance of male births was influenced by the patriotic enthusiasm aroused by the present war. This was apparently offered as a facetious comment and it was accepted as such by the council receiving the report. Our British contemporary1 that gives us the item does not appear to take it kindly as such. It not only ironically congratulates the council on...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1900 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1900.02460210054011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An English medical statistician, in reporting on the mortality of his district, for 1899, took the occasion to suggest that the predominance of male births was influenced by the patriotic enthusiasm aroused by the present war. This was apparently offered as a facetious comment and it was accepted as such by the council receiving the report. Our British contemporary1 that gives us the item does not appear to take it kindly as such. It not only ironically congratulates the council on its sense of humor, but gravely proceeds to remark that the figures are too small to afford any sound conclusions, and that a still greater fallacy is involved since it is impossible to suppose that maternal patriotic zeal could have affected the sex of unborn children in the last two or three months of pregnancy. Hence it says: "absurdities of this kind will do nothing to advance the

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 26, 1900

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