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Do Brief Preventive Interventions for Patients at Suicide Risk Work?

Do Brief Preventive Interventions for Patients at Suicide Risk Work? Editorial Opinion fellow trainees that encouraged either perspective taking on the biological, psychological, and social factors that may also influ- self and others or compassion generation reduced acute corti- ence the disease progress and its prognosis. Against this sol responses to psychosocial stress by more than 50%. On the backdrop, the meta-analysis by Shields and colleagues is an other hand, the training of attention and interoceptive aware- important confirmation of the biopsychosocial model. ness, which did not involve daily peer interaction, had no such While psychophysiological, neurobiological, and epigenetic benefits. We argue that getting accustomed to self-disclosure and research in the past 15 years has provided impressive evidence learning to accept the evaluation of others may be a driving force for the involvement of psychological and social factors in in group therapy. Ultimately, this process may immunize indi- pathogenesis, a comprehensive examination of whether viduals, so to speak, against threats to the social self, thus re- different psychosocial interventions successfully influence ducing their susceptibility to the essence of psychosocial stress. immune parameters in different physical health conditions has Infectious diseases are no longer the main cause of death in been lacking. The evidence provided by Shields et al is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Psychiatry American Medical Association

Do Brief Preventive Interventions for Patients at Suicide Risk Work?

JAMA Psychiatry , Volume 77 (10) – Oct 17, 2020

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2020 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-622X
eISSN
2168-6238
DOI
10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2020.1287
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorial Opinion fellow trainees that encouraged either perspective taking on the biological, psychological, and social factors that may also influ- self and others or compassion generation reduced acute corti- ence the disease progress and its prognosis. Against this sol responses to psychosocial stress by more than 50%. On the backdrop, the meta-analysis by Shields and colleagues is an other hand, the training of attention and interoceptive aware- important confirmation of the biopsychosocial model. ness, which did not involve daily peer interaction, had no such While psychophysiological, neurobiological, and epigenetic benefits. We argue that getting accustomed to self-disclosure and research in the past 15 years has provided impressive evidence learning to accept the evaluation of others may be a driving force for the involvement of psychological and social factors in in group therapy. Ultimately, this process may immunize indi- pathogenesis, a comprehensive examination of whether viduals, so to speak, against threats to the social self, thus re- different psychosocial interventions successfully influence ducing their susceptibility to the essence of psychosocial stress. immune parameters in different physical health conditions has Infectious diseases are no longer the main cause of death in been lacking. The evidence provided by Shields et al is

Journal

JAMA PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 17, 2020

References