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Disposable Pump Oxygenator for Perfusion in Small Animals: Used in Perfusing Chemically Modified Antibodies

Disposable Pump Oxygenator for Perfusion in Small Animals: Used in Perfusing Chemically Modified... Abstract Two methods can be used for perfusing small animals. Either the heart and lung of a second animal can be used as pump and oxygenator or a small mechanical oxygenator can be used. With a mechanical pump oxygenator, the liver, lung, and spleen can be excluded in the perfusion of an extremity, for example. The exclusion of these organs is particularly helpful for a study of the perfusion of colloids, since these organs can remove some colloids in a single passage of blood.1 For a research program on chemically modified antibodies for cancer therapy, antibody complexes with a variety of radioactive and nonradioactive colloids are being investigated. The cytotoxic colloids being used include the fissionable actinides and boron-10 for the neutron capture therapy of tumors2; β and γ emittors; magnetic particles such as iron oxide for inductive heating of tumors, and suitably insolubilized antimetabolites and chelating agents. In References 1. Clay Adams Intramedic Polyethylene Tubing, PE 205 was used. 2. Dispo-plugs supplied by Scientific Products Division of American Hospital Supply Corporation were used. 3. Kindly loaned to the author by Steven G. Economou, M.D., of Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital, Chicago. 4. Sheppard, C. W.; Jordan, G., and Hahn, P. F.: Disappearance of Isotopically Labeled Gold Colloids from the Circulation of the Dog , Am. J. Physiol. 164:345-350, 1951. 5. Knock, F. E.: Perfusion of Uranium-Antibody Complexes for the Neutron Capture Therapy of Tumors , Surg. Gynec. & Obst. 109:445-449, 1959. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Disposable Pump Oxygenator for Perfusion in Small Animals: Used in Perfusing Chemically Modified Antibodies

Archives of Surgery , Volume 81 (4) – Oct 1, 1960

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1960.01300040152029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Two methods can be used for perfusing small animals. Either the heart and lung of a second animal can be used as pump and oxygenator or a small mechanical oxygenator can be used. With a mechanical pump oxygenator, the liver, lung, and spleen can be excluded in the perfusion of an extremity, for example. The exclusion of these organs is particularly helpful for a study of the perfusion of colloids, since these organs can remove some colloids in a single passage of blood.1 For a research program on chemically modified antibodies for cancer therapy, antibody complexes with a variety of radioactive and nonradioactive colloids are being investigated. The cytotoxic colloids being used include the fissionable actinides and boron-10 for the neutron capture therapy of tumors2; β and γ emittors; magnetic particles such as iron oxide for inductive heating of tumors, and suitably insolubilized antimetabolites and chelating agents. In References 1. Clay Adams Intramedic Polyethylene Tubing, PE 205 was used. 2. Dispo-plugs supplied by Scientific Products Division of American Hospital Supply Corporation were used. 3. Kindly loaned to the author by Steven G. Economou, M.D., of Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital, Chicago. 4. Sheppard, C. W.; Jordan, G., and Hahn, P. F.: Disappearance of Isotopically Labeled Gold Colloids from the Circulation of the Dog , Am. J. Physiol. 164:345-350, 1951. 5. Knock, F. E.: Perfusion of Uranium-Antibody Complexes for the Neutron Capture Therapy of Tumors , Surg. Gynec. & Obst. 109:445-449, 1959.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1960

References