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DISEASES OF THE SALIVARY GLANDS

DISEASES OF THE SALIVARY GLANDS The secretions of the buccal cavity are derived from a number of secretory glands, the parotid, submaxillary and sublingual glands; the glands of Blandin and Nuhn, the palatal glands, Moore glands and a number of small mucus-secreting units situated in the floor of the mouth and the buccal surfaces of the cheeks. For practical purposes I may limit my consideration to the parotid and submaxillary glands. These are the two chief structures which enter into my discussion because they are the only ones frequently affected by pathologic conditions which come to the attention of the otolaryngologist. The sublingual glands are of lesser significance. Aside from the fact that they may enter into a somewhat vicarious form of ranula, they hold little interest for the otolaryngologist. Occasionally a duct of one of the sublingual glands will become obstructed, causing a myxomatous degeneration and a swelling in the floor of the mouth http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

DISEASES OF THE SALIVARY GLANDS

JAMA , Volume 136 (1) – Jan 3, 1948

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1948 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1948.02890180003001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The secretions of the buccal cavity are derived from a number of secretory glands, the parotid, submaxillary and sublingual glands; the glands of Blandin and Nuhn, the palatal glands, Moore glands and a number of small mucus-secreting units situated in the floor of the mouth and the buccal surfaces of the cheeks. For practical purposes I may limit my consideration to the parotid and submaxillary glands. These are the two chief structures which enter into my discussion because they are the only ones frequently affected by pathologic conditions which come to the attention of the otolaryngologist. The sublingual glands are of lesser significance. Aside from the fact that they may enter into a somewhat vicarious form of ranula, they hold little interest for the otolaryngologist. Occasionally a duct of one of the sublingual glands will become obstructed, causing a myxomatous degeneration and a swelling in the floor of the mouth

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 3, 1948

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