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Diplacusis: II. Etiology

Diplacusis: II. Etiology Abstract DIPLACUSIS may be congenital as seen in "tone-deaf" people, or acquired when due to allergy, trauma, infection, toxin, and neoplasm. Provocative food testing will often elicit diplacusis which can be improved by a strict allergic regimen. Trauma may vary from the din of a discotheque to a direct blow to the head or to iatrogenic injury. Infection may be indirect as with a focus in septic tonsils or direct pressure on the oval or round windows in a suppurative otitis media. Toxic factors include: aspirin, quinine, streptomycin, kanamycin, carbon monoxide, and excessive sodium intake. Leukemia, with associated cochlear hemorrhage or acoustic neurinoma, with initial "coagulum" effect, are neoplastic causes of diplacusis. Cochlear dysharmonics result from physical, chemical and bioelectric effects of anoxia, vasopasm, edema, abnormal capillary permeability, hemorrhage, exudate, and viscosity changes. Capillary fragility can be easily tested using the vacuum-cup method with graduated suction of 10 to 20 or References 1. Ward, W.D.; Selters, W.; and Glorig, A.: Exploratory Studies on Temporary Threshold Shift From Impulses , J Acoust Soc Amer 33:781-793, 1961.Crossref 2. Meador, M.M.: Pitch Perception Displacements Occurring With Pre- and Post-Stimulatory Fatigue, thesis, Wayne State University, 1963. 3. Norris, T.W.: Diplacusis Associated With Unilateral High Frequency Hearing Loss, thesis, Wayne State University, 1962. 4. Berendes, J.: Klinische Beobachtungen und Betractungen zur Diplakusis . Arch Ohr Nas Kehlkopfheilk . 167:288-295, 1955.Crossref 5. Bekesy, G. von: Current Status of Theories of Hearing , Science 123:779-783, 1956.Crossref 6. Tonndorf, J.: Mechanism of Hearing Loss in Early Cases of Endolymphatic Hydrops , Ann Otol 66:766-784, 1957. 7. Kobrak, H.: Influence of the Middle Ear on Labyrinthine Pressure , Arch Otolaryng 21:547-560, 1935.Crossref 8. Jeffress, L.A.: Interaural Phase Difference and Pitch Variation: Day-to-Day Changes , Amer J Psychol 62:1-19, 1949.Crossref 9. Vinnikov, Y.A., and Titova, L.K.: The Oorgan of Corti , New York: Consultants Bureau Enterprises, Inc., 1964. 10. Hallpike, C.S., and Graham, A.B.: Sensorineural Hearing Processes and Disorders , Boston: Little, Brown & Company, 1967. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1968 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1968.00760060606010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract DIPLACUSIS may be congenital as seen in "tone-deaf" people, or acquired when due to allergy, trauma, infection, toxin, and neoplasm. Provocative food testing will often elicit diplacusis which can be improved by a strict allergic regimen. Trauma may vary from the din of a discotheque to a direct blow to the head or to iatrogenic injury. Infection may be indirect as with a focus in septic tonsils or direct pressure on the oval or round windows in a suppurative otitis media. Toxic factors include: aspirin, quinine, streptomycin, kanamycin, carbon monoxide, and excessive sodium intake. Leukemia, with associated cochlear hemorrhage or acoustic neurinoma, with initial "coagulum" effect, are neoplastic causes of diplacusis. Cochlear dysharmonics result from physical, chemical and bioelectric effects of anoxia, vasopasm, edema, abnormal capillary permeability, hemorrhage, exudate, and viscosity changes. Capillary fragility can be easily tested using the vacuum-cup method with graduated suction of 10 to 20 or References 1. Ward, W.D.; Selters, W.; and Glorig, A.: Exploratory Studies on Temporary Threshold Shift From Impulses , J Acoust Soc Amer 33:781-793, 1961.Crossref 2. Meador, M.M.: Pitch Perception Displacements Occurring With Pre- and Post-Stimulatory Fatigue, thesis, Wayne State University, 1963. 3. Norris, T.W.: Diplacusis Associated With Unilateral High Frequency Hearing Loss, thesis, Wayne State University, 1962. 4. Berendes, J.: Klinische Beobachtungen und Betractungen zur Diplakusis . Arch Ohr Nas Kehlkopfheilk . 167:288-295, 1955.Crossref 5. Bekesy, G. von: Current Status of Theories of Hearing , Science 123:779-783, 1956.Crossref 6. Tonndorf, J.: Mechanism of Hearing Loss in Early Cases of Endolymphatic Hydrops , Ann Otol 66:766-784, 1957. 7. Kobrak, H.: Influence of the Middle Ear on Labyrinthine Pressure , Arch Otolaryng 21:547-560, 1935.Crossref 8. Jeffress, L.A.: Interaural Phase Difference and Pitch Variation: Day-to-Day Changes , Amer J Psychol 62:1-19, 1949.Crossref 9. Vinnikov, Y.A., and Titova, L.K.: The Oorgan of Corti , New York: Consultants Bureau Enterprises, Inc., 1964. 10. Hallpike, C.S., and Graham, A.B.: Sensorineural Hearing Processes and Disorders , Boston: Little, Brown & Company, 1967.

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1968

References