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Dietary Fiber and Disease

Dietary Fiber and Disease Many diseases common in and characteristic of modern western civilization have been shown to be related to the amount of time necessary for the passage of intestinal content through the alimentary tract, and to the bulk and consistency of stools. These factors have in turn been shown to be greatly influenced by the fiber content of the diet and by the amount of cereal fiber in particular. Mechanisms are postulated whereby these changes in gastrointestinal behavior could in part explain the occurrence of such common disorders as ischemic heart disease, appendicitis, diverticular disease, gallbladder disease, varicose veins, deep vein thrombosis, hiatus hernia, and tumors of the large bowel. Calorie intake, speed of passage through the intestine, levels of intracolonic pressures, number and type fecal bacteria, as well as levels of serum cholesterol and changes in bile-salt metabolism have all been shown to be related to the amount of dietary fiber consumed. (JAMA 229:1068-1074, 1974) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Dietary Fiber and Disease

JAMA , Volume 229 (8) – Aug 19, 1974

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1974.03230460018013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many diseases common in and characteristic of modern western civilization have been shown to be related to the amount of time necessary for the passage of intestinal content through the alimentary tract, and to the bulk and consistency of stools. These factors have in turn been shown to be greatly influenced by the fiber content of the diet and by the amount of cereal fiber in particular. Mechanisms are postulated whereby these changes in gastrointestinal behavior could in part explain the occurrence of such common disorders as ischemic heart disease, appendicitis, diverticular disease, gallbladder disease, varicose veins, deep vein thrombosis, hiatus hernia, and tumors of the large bowel. Calorie intake, speed of passage through the intestine, levels of intracolonic pressures, number and type fecal bacteria, as well as levels of serum cholesterol and changes in bile-salt metabolism have all been shown to be related to the amount of dietary fiber consumed. (JAMA 229:1068-1074, 1974)

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 19, 1974

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