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DIETARY FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE DEXTROSE TOLERANCE TEST: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

DIETARY FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE DEXTROSE TOLERANCE TEST: A PRELIMINARY STUDY Abstract The dextrose tolerance test is now being extensively employed as a diagnostic procedure. It is most beneficially used in the differentiation of mild diabetes mellitus and renal diabetes. It is also being used, and is believed to be of diagnostic value, in many pathologic conditions, such as encephalitis, malignant tumor, pituitary and thyroid dysfunctions and nephritis.1 Although it is definitely established as a diagnostic procedure, there is some diversity of opinion concerning what constitutes a normal response to the oral administration of dextrose. Some writers state that in a healthy person there may be a postprandial rise in blood sugar of from 14 to 16 per cent and a return to the normal within two hours.2 There are other writers3 who consider a postprandial hyperglycemia of 20 per cent within normal limits. It is generally believed that the persistence of the postprandial hyperglycemia is of more diagnostic significance than the References 1. Gray, Horace: Blood Sugar Standards in Conditions Neither Normal nor Diabetic , Arch. Int. Med. 31:259 ( (Feb.) ) 1923.Crossref 2. John, H. J.: Ann. Clin. Med. 5:340, 1926. 3. Friedenwald, J., and Grove, J. G.: Am. J. M. Sc. 33:163, 1922. 4. Paullin, J. E., and Sauls, H. C.: South. M. J. 15:249, 1922.Crossref 5. Mosenthal, Herman O.: M. Clin. N. Amer. 9:549, 1925. 6. Mosenthal (footnote 1, fifth reference). 7. Macleod: Physiology and Biochemistry in Modern Medicine , ed. 5, St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1926, p. 876. 8. Hale-White, R., and Payne, W. W.: Quart. J. Med. 19:393, 1926.Crossref 9. Gilbert, Max; Schneider, Hans, and Bock, Joseph C.: J. Biol. Chem. 68:629, 1926. 10. Mosenthal (footnote 1, fifth reference). 11. John, H. J.: J. M. Research 4:255, 1923. 12. Macleod (footnote 2, second reference). 13. Mosenthal (footnote 1, fifth reference). 14. McCaskey, G. W.: The Basal Metabolism and Hyperglycemic Tests of Hyperthyroidism , J. A. M. A. 73:243 ( (July 26) ) 1919.Crossref 15. Rohdenburg, G. L.; Bernhard, A., and Krebbiel, O.: Am. J. M. S. 159:577, 1920.Crossref 16. Folin and Wu: J. Biol. Chem. 38:81, 1919. 17. Hale-White and Payne (footnote 3, first reference). 18. Andrews, Edmund: Water Metabolism; Sugar Metabolism in Dehydration , Arch. Int. Med. 38:136 ( (July) ) 1926.Crossref 19. Hartmann, A. F., and Schaffer, P. A.: J. Biol. Chem. 45:368, 1920. 20. Lawrence, R. D.: Quart. J. Med. 20:69 ( (Oct.) ) 1926.Crossref 21. reference 5 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

DIETARY FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE DEXTROSE TOLERANCE TEST: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 40 (6) – Dec 1, 1927

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1927 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0730-188X
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1927.00130120077005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The dextrose tolerance test is now being extensively employed as a diagnostic procedure. It is most beneficially used in the differentiation of mild diabetes mellitus and renal diabetes. It is also being used, and is believed to be of diagnostic value, in many pathologic conditions, such as encephalitis, malignant tumor, pituitary and thyroid dysfunctions and nephritis.1 Although it is definitely established as a diagnostic procedure, there is some diversity of opinion concerning what constitutes a normal response to the oral administration of dextrose. Some writers state that in a healthy person there may be a postprandial rise in blood sugar of from 14 to 16 per cent and a return to the normal within two hours.2 There are other writers3 who consider a postprandial hyperglycemia of 20 per cent within normal limits. It is generally believed that the persistence of the postprandial hyperglycemia is of more diagnostic significance than the References 1. Gray, Horace: Blood Sugar Standards in Conditions Neither Normal nor Diabetic , Arch. Int. Med. 31:259 ( (Feb.) ) 1923.Crossref 2. John, H. J.: Ann. Clin. Med. 5:340, 1926. 3. Friedenwald, J., and Grove, J. G.: Am. J. M. Sc. 33:163, 1922. 4. Paullin, J. E., and Sauls, H. C.: South. M. J. 15:249, 1922.Crossref 5. Mosenthal, Herman O.: M. Clin. N. Amer. 9:549, 1925. 6. Mosenthal (footnote 1, fifth reference). 7. Macleod: Physiology and Biochemistry in Modern Medicine , ed. 5, St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1926, p. 876. 8. Hale-White, R., and Payne, W. W.: Quart. J. Med. 19:393, 1926.Crossref 9. Gilbert, Max; Schneider, Hans, and Bock, Joseph C.: J. Biol. Chem. 68:629, 1926. 10. Mosenthal (footnote 1, fifth reference). 11. John, H. J.: J. M. Research 4:255, 1923. 12. Macleod (footnote 2, second reference). 13. Mosenthal (footnote 1, fifth reference). 14. McCaskey, G. W.: The Basal Metabolism and Hyperglycemic Tests of Hyperthyroidism , J. A. M. A. 73:243 ( (July 26) ) 1919.Crossref 15. Rohdenburg, G. L.; Bernhard, A., and Krebbiel, O.: Am. J. M. S. 159:577, 1920.Crossref 16. Folin and Wu: J. Biol. Chem. 38:81, 1919. 17. Hale-White and Payne (footnote 3, first reference). 18. Andrews, Edmund: Water Metabolism; Sugar Metabolism in Dehydration , Arch. Int. Med. 38:136 ( (July) ) 1926.Crossref 19. Hartmann, A. F., and Schaffer, P. A.: J. Biol. Chem. 45:368, 1920. 20. Lawrence, R. D.: Quart. J. Med. 20:69 ( (Oct.) ) 1926.Crossref 21. reference 5

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1927

References