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DEVENTER'S METHOD OF DELIVERY OF THE AFTER-COMING HEAD.

DEVENTER'S METHOD OF DELIVERY OF THE AFTER-COMING HEAD. The utterances of Dr. John Bartlett upon obstetrical topics always deserve and commonly receive close attention. It is the purpose of this note to discuss briefly his last contribution to the art of midwifery, "A Study of Deventer's Method of Delivering of the After-Coming Head."1 As interpreted by Dr. Bartlett, Deventer's plan differs in essential points from the procedure in vogue, known as the Smellie-Veit method. The posture of the woman is identical with that commonly assumed at the present day—dorsal decubitus, hips elevated. As soon as the child has passed so far as the base of the thorax, extractive efforts are to be made, in a direction downward and a little backward. When the arms are within reach an examination of their relation to the head should be made. Should their position be favorable, that is, on either side of the head, resting anteriorly to the parietal protuberances, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

DEVENTER'S METHOD OF DELIVERY OF THE AFTER-COMING HEAD.

JAMA , Volume XII (22) – Jun 1, 1889

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1889 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1889.02400990015006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The utterances of Dr. John Bartlett upon obstetrical topics always deserve and commonly receive close attention. It is the purpose of this note to discuss briefly his last contribution to the art of midwifery, "A Study of Deventer's Method of Delivering of the After-Coming Head."1 As interpreted by Dr. Bartlett, Deventer's plan differs in essential points from the procedure in vogue, known as the Smellie-Veit method. The posture of the woman is identical with that commonly assumed at the present day—dorsal decubitus, hips elevated. As soon as the child has passed so far as the base of the thorax, extractive efforts are to be made, in a direction downward and a little backward. When the arms are within reach an examination of their relation to the head should be made. Should their position be favorable, that is, on either side of the head, resting anteriorly to the parietal protuberances,

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1889

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