Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Developmental Study of Coordinated Eye Movements in the Human Infant: II. An Electro-Oculographic Study of the Fixation Reflex in the Newborn

Developmental Study of Coordinated Eye Movements in the Human Infant: II. An Electro-Oculographic... Abstract The term "fixation reflex," as used in this paper, refers to the optomotor reflex responsible for the placement and the maintenance of the image of an object on the fovea. Duke-Elder, Linksz, and others have termed the fine adjustments necessary for the continued presence of the same image on the fovea "refixation," and reserve fixation for the initial foveal placement.1,2 Adler has referred to the fixation reflex in reference only to the maintenance of the image on the fovea after the object of regard has first been captured by what he speaks of as the "following reflexes."3 As defined for use in this study, the fixation reflex in the newborn has been considered to be only feebly developed, the response being limited to a strong stimulus such as a bright light.4 For at least the first two weeks of life, most eye movements are said to be References 1. Offner R. Dynagraph used as the recording instrument. 2. H-R Jelly. 3. Modified Grass electrodes. 4. Duke-Elder, W. S.: Textbook of Ophthalmology , St. Louis: The C. V. Mosby Co., 1949, vol 2, p 3819. 5. Linksz, A.: Physiology of Eye-Vision , New York: Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1952, vol 2, p 698. 6. Adler, F. H.: Physiology of Eye: Clinical Application , third ed, St. Louis: The C. V. Mosby Co., 1959, p 429. 7. Duke-Elder, W. S.: Textbook of Ophthalmology , St. Louis: The C. V. Mosby Co., 1949, vol 4, p 3820. 8. Chavasse, F. B.; Lyle, T. K.; and Bridgeman, G. J. O.: Squint , London: Bailliere, Tindall and Cox, 1959, p 41. 9. McGinnis, J. M.: Eye Movement and Optic Nystagmus in Early Infancy , Genet Psychol Monogr 8:374-402, 1930. 10. Marg, E.: Development of Electro-Oculography: Standing Potential of Eye in Registration of Eye Movement , AMA Arch Ophthal 45:169-185, 1951.Crossref 11. Shackel, B.: Pilot Study in Electro-Oculography , Brit J Ophthal 44:89-113, 1960.Crossref 12. Shackel, B.: "Electro-Oculography: Electrical Recording of Eye Position," in Proceedings of the Third International Conference in Medical Electronics, 1960. 13. Hallpike, C. S.; Hood, J. D.; and Trinder, E.: Some Observations on Technical and Clinical Problems of Electro-Nystagmography , Confin Neurol 20:232-240, 1960.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Developmental Study of Coordinated Eye Movements in the Human Infant: II. An Electro-Oculographic Study of the Fixation Reflex in the Newborn

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/developmental-study-of-coordinated-eye-movements-in-the-human-infant-i47ZbkwrwJ
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1964 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1964.00970010887018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The term "fixation reflex," as used in this paper, refers to the optomotor reflex responsible for the placement and the maintenance of the image of an object on the fovea. Duke-Elder, Linksz, and others have termed the fine adjustments necessary for the continued presence of the same image on the fovea "refixation," and reserve fixation for the initial foveal placement.1,2 Adler has referred to the fixation reflex in reference only to the maintenance of the image on the fovea after the object of regard has first been captured by what he speaks of as the "following reflexes."3 As defined for use in this study, the fixation reflex in the newborn has been considered to be only feebly developed, the response being limited to a strong stimulus such as a bright light.4 For at least the first two weeks of life, most eye movements are said to be References 1. Offner R. Dynagraph used as the recording instrument. 2. H-R Jelly. 3. Modified Grass electrodes. 4. Duke-Elder, W. S.: Textbook of Ophthalmology , St. Louis: The C. V. Mosby Co., 1949, vol 2, p 3819. 5. Linksz, A.: Physiology of Eye-Vision , New York: Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1952, vol 2, p 698. 6. Adler, F. H.: Physiology of Eye: Clinical Application , third ed, St. Louis: The C. V. Mosby Co., 1959, p 429. 7. Duke-Elder, W. S.: Textbook of Ophthalmology , St. Louis: The C. V. Mosby Co., 1949, vol 4, p 3820. 8. Chavasse, F. B.; Lyle, T. K.; and Bridgeman, G. J. O.: Squint , London: Bailliere, Tindall and Cox, 1959, p 41. 9. McGinnis, J. M.: Eye Movement and Optic Nystagmus in Early Infancy , Genet Psychol Monogr 8:374-402, 1930. 10. Marg, E.: Development of Electro-Oculography: Standing Potential of Eye in Registration of Eye Movement , AMA Arch Ophthal 45:169-185, 1951.Crossref 11. Shackel, B.: Pilot Study in Electro-Oculography , Brit J Ophthal 44:89-113, 1960.Crossref 12. Shackel, B.: "Electro-Oculography: Electrical Recording of Eye Position," in Proceedings of the Third International Conference in Medical Electronics, 1960. 13. Hallpike, C. S.; Hood, J. D.; and Trinder, E.: Some Observations on Technical and Clinical Problems of Electro-Nystagmography , Confin Neurol 20:232-240, 1960.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1964

References