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Developmental Dyslexia: Evidence for a Subgroup With a Reversal of Cerebral Asymmetry

Developmental Dyslexia: Evidence for a Subgroup With a Reversal of Cerebral Asymmetry Abstract • The computerized brain tomograms of 24 patients with developmental dyslexia were analyzed for cerebral asymmetry. Ten patients showed a reversal of the pattern of asymmetry regularly observed in normal right-handed individuals so that the right parietooccipital region was wider than the left. The ten dyslexic patients with this reversal of cerebral asymmetry had a lower mean verbal IQ than the other 14 dyslexic patients in this study. The reversal of cerebral asymmetry that occurred in ten of the dyslexic patients may result in language lateralization to a cerebral hemisphere that is structurally less suited to support language function and thus act as a risk factor for the development of reading disability. References 1. Critchley M: The Dyslexic Child . London, Heinemann Books, 1970, pp 1-137. 2. Benton AL: Developmental dyslexia: Neurological aspects , in Friedlander WJ (ed): Current Reviews of Higher Nervous System Function . New York, Raven Press, 1975, pp 1-48. 3. Geschwind N, Levitsky W: Human brain: Left-right asymmetries in temporal speech region . Science 161:186-187, 1968.Crossref 4. LeMay M: Morphological cerebral asymmetries of modern man, fossil man, and nonhuman primates . Ann NY Acad Sci 280:349-366, 1976.Crossref 5. LeMay M, Culebras A: Human brain: Morphologic differences in the hemispheres demonstrable by carotid arteriography . N Engl J Med 287:168-170, 1972.Crossref 6. Witelson SF, Pallie W: Left hemisphere specialization for language in the newborn: Neuroanatomical evidence of asymmetry . Brain 96:641-646, 1973.Crossref 7. Wada JA, Clarke R, Hamm A: Cerebral hemispheric asymmetry in humans: Cortical speech zones in 100 adult and 100 infant brains . Arch Neurol 32:239-246, 1975.Crossref 8. Chi JG, Dooling EC, Gilles FH: Left-right asymmetries of the temporal speech areas of the human fetus . Arch Neurol 34:346-348, 1977.Crossref 9. Colton T: Statistics in Medicine . Boston, Little Brown & Co, 1974. 10. LeMay M: Asymmetries of the skull and handedness: Phrenology revisited . J Neurol Sci 32:243-253, 1977.Crossref 11. Witelson SF: Developmental dyslexia: Two right hemispheres and none left . Science 195:309-311, 1977.Crossref 12. Springer SP, Eisenson J: Hemispheric specialization for speech in language-disordered children . Neuro psychologia 15:287-294, 1977. 13. Dennis M, Whitaker HA: Language acquisition following hemidecortication: Linguistic superiority of the left over right hemisphere . Brain Lang 3:404-433, 1976.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Developmental Dyslexia: Evidence for a Subgroup With a Reversal of Cerebral Asymmetry

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1978 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1978.00500260028005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • The computerized brain tomograms of 24 patients with developmental dyslexia were analyzed for cerebral asymmetry. Ten patients showed a reversal of the pattern of asymmetry regularly observed in normal right-handed individuals so that the right parietooccipital region was wider than the left. The ten dyslexic patients with this reversal of cerebral asymmetry had a lower mean verbal IQ than the other 14 dyslexic patients in this study. The reversal of cerebral asymmetry that occurred in ten of the dyslexic patients may result in language lateralization to a cerebral hemisphere that is structurally less suited to support language function and thus act as a risk factor for the development of reading disability. References 1. Critchley M: The Dyslexic Child . London, Heinemann Books, 1970, pp 1-137. 2. Benton AL: Developmental dyslexia: Neurological aspects , in Friedlander WJ (ed): Current Reviews of Higher Nervous System Function . New York, Raven Press, 1975, pp 1-48. 3. Geschwind N, Levitsky W: Human brain: Left-right asymmetries in temporal speech region . Science 161:186-187, 1968.Crossref 4. LeMay M: Morphological cerebral asymmetries of modern man, fossil man, and nonhuman primates . Ann NY Acad Sci 280:349-366, 1976.Crossref 5. LeMay M, Culebras A: Human brain: Morphologic differences in the hemispheres demonstrable by carotid arteriography . N Engl J Med 287:168-170, 1972.Crossref 6. Witelson SF, Pallie W: Left hemisphere specialization for language in the newborn: Neuroanatomical evidence of asymmetry . Brain 96:641-646, 1973.Crossref 7. Wada JA, Clarke R, Hamm A: Cerebral hemispheric asymmetry in humans: Cortical speech zones in 100 adult and 100 infant brains . Arch Neurol 32:239-246, 1975.Crossref 8. Chi JG, Dooling EC, Gilles FH: Left-right asymmetries of the temporal speech areas of the human fetus . Arch Neurol 34:346-348, 1977.Crossref 9. Colton T: Statistics in Medicine . Boston, Little Brown & Co, 1974. 10. LeMay M: Asymmetries of the skull and handedness: Phrenology revisited . J Neurol Sci 32:243-253, 1977.Crossref 11. Witelson SF: Developmental dyslexia: Two right hemispheres and none left . Science 195:309-311, 1977.Crossref 12. Springer SP, Eisenson J: Hemispheric specialization for speech in language-disordered children . Neuro psychologia 15:287-294, 1977. 13. Dennis M, Whitaker HA: Language acquisition following hemidecortication: Linguistic superiority of the left over right hemisphere . Brain Lang 3:404-433, 1976.Crossref

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1978

References

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