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DESCRIPTION OF AN ADVANCEMENT SUTURE.

DESCRIPTION OF AN ADVANCEMENT SUTURE. I am a firm believer in conservative surgery and advocate careful operative interference only in suitable cases after all other means, e. g., the use of proper lenses, prism exercises, or fusion training, have failed to accomplish the desired results, to wit: cosmetic straightening of the eyes, parallelism of the optic axes, fixation, establishment of binocular single vision, and in phorias, obtaining the normal balance. I do not intend to discuss the many excellent non-operative methods of treating or aiding these cases, but in this paper I presuppose that all of these have failed, and turn in proper cases to operative procedures as a last resort. I think that an advancement, alone or combined with a tenotomy, is practically always to be preferred to a tenotomy alone. An external ocular muscle is seldom too strong, the rotation of an eye rarely exceeds the normal, but in squint and heterophoria, defective http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

DESCRIPTION OF AN ADVANCEMENT SUTURE.

JAMA , Volume XLV (11) – Sep 9, 1905

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.52510110020001c
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I am a firm believer in conservative surgery and advocate careful operative interference only in suitable cases after all other means, e. g., the use of proper lenses, prism exercises, or fusion training, have failed to accomplish the desired results, to wit: cosmetic straightening of the eyes, parallelism of the optic axes, fixation, establishment of binocular single vision, and in phorias, obtaining the normal balance. I do not intend to discuss the many excellent non-operative methods of treating or aiding these cases, but in this paper I presuppose that all of these have failed, and turn in proper cases to operative procedures as a last resort. I think that an advancement, alone or combined with a tenotomy, is practically always to be preferred to a tenotomy alone. An external ocular muscle is seldom too strong, the rotation of an eye rarely exceeds the normal, but in squint and heterophoria, defective

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 9, 1905

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