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Dermoscopy of Melanocytic Neoplasms

Dermoscopy of Melanocytic Neoplasms skINsight SECTION EDITOR: JAMES M. GRICHNIK, MD, PhD Combined Blue Nevi Editor’s Note: The skINsight section is a forum for the presentation of dermatologic images. The current ef- fort is to foster the recognition of patterns in dermatologic disease processes that may enhance both diagnostic and research capabilities. The initial focus is on dermoscopic images. Theoretically, these patterns reflect the interaction of specific gene defects with local environmental factors. The exercise here is to group lesions with similar dermoscopic patterns—not pathologic criteria. The ultimate benign or malignant behavior is not the focus of this section. he lesions shown are from the cheek of an components appear to have similar dimensions. Theo- 18-year-old white man (Figure 1), and the retically, combined blue nevi may result from a clone of T cheek of an 8-year-old white child (Figure 2) cells that migrate and differentiate along 2 different (size bar, 5 mm). Both the lesions reveal a relatively pathways. Another possibility could include a field similar pattern. Coloration is clearly two-tone with a effect resulting in a secondary melanocytic proliferation brown overlying component and an underlying blue in response to factors secreted from the primary popu- component. In the lesions shown, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Dermatology American Medical Association

Dermoscopy of Melanocytic Neoplasms

JAMA Dermatology , Volume 140 (7) – Jul 1, 2004

Dermoscopy of Melanocytic Neoplasms

Abstract

skINsight SECTION EDITOR: JAMES M. GRICHNIK, MD, PhD Combined Blue Nevi Editor’s Note: The skINsight section is a forum for the presentation of dermatologic images. The current ef- fort is to foster the recognition of patterns in dermatologic disease processes that may enhance both diagnostic and research capabilities. The initial focus is on dermoscopic images. Theoretically, these patterns reflect the interaction of specific gene defects with local environmental factors. The exercise...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2004 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6068
eISSN
2168-6084
DOI
10.1001/archderm.140.7.902
pmid
15262714
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

skINsight SECTION EDITOR: JAMES M. GRICHNIK, MD, PhD Combined Blue Nevi Editor’s Note: The skINsight section is a forum for the presentation of dermatologic images. The current ef- fort is to foster the recognition of patterns in dermatologic disease processes that may enhance both diagnostic and research capabilities. The initial focus is on dermoscopic images. Theoretically, these patterns reflect the interaction of specific gene defects with local environmental factors. The exercise here is to group lesions with similar dermoscopic patterns—not pathologic criteria. The ultimate benign or malignant behavior is not the focus of this section. he lesions shown are from the cheek of an components appear to have similar dimensions. Theo- 18-year-old white man (Figure 1), and the retically, combined blue nevi may result from a clone of T cheek of an 8-year-old white child (Figure 2) cells that migrate and differentiate along 2 different (size bar, 5 mm). Both the lesions reveal a relatively pathways. Another possibility could include a field similar pattern. Coloration is clearly two-tone with a effect resulting in a secondary melanocytic proliferation brown overlying component and an underlying blue in response to factors secreted from the primary popu- component. In the lesions shown, the

Journal

JAMA DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 2004

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