Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Dermatomyositis

Dermatomyositis Abstract To the Editor.— I am constantly astonished by what one can learn by reading journals. Last week I was called to the bedside of a middle-aged woman with typical myositis complete with elevated enzyme levels. The consulting internist, Dr. Jason Lucas of Lexington, Mass, asked me if I could find cutaneous confirmation of the diagnosis of dermatomyositis.After a diligent search, I reported with regret that I could detect only longitudinal striate yellow fingernails and toenails and a dry scaling of the cuticle bed, such as the one I myself have had in the winter. I pointed out that these changes are seen in psoriasis on occasion as well as in Reiter syndrome. Some cases of dermatomyositis are preceded by psoriasiform eruptions. I have attended patients who developed a generalized erythroderma, one of whom developed hypothermic coma.1Having read with great enjoyment Dr. Samitz's article in the Archives,2 References 1. Yaffee HS: Hypothermic coma and exfoliative dermatitis . JAMA 207:367, 1969.Crossref 2. Samitz MH: Cuticular changes in dermatomyositis . Arch Dermatol 110:866-867, 1974.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Dermatomyositis

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— I am constantly astonished by what one can learn by reading journals. Last week I was called to the bedside of a middle-aged woman with typical myositis complete with elevated enzyme levels. The consulting internist, Dr. Jason Lucas of Lexington, Mass, asked me if I could find cutaneous confirmation of the diagnosis of dermatomyositis.After a diligent search, I reported with regret that I could detect only longitudinal striate yellow fingernails and toenails and...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/dermatomyositis-tJTil06yqC
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1975 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1975.01630190119026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— I am constantly astonished by what one can learn by reading journals. Last week I was called to the bedside of a middle-aged woman with typical myositis complete with elevated enzyme levels. The consulting internist, Dr. Jason Lucas of Lexington, Mass, asked me if I could find cutaneous confirmation of the diagnosis of dermatomyositis.After a diligent search, I reported with regret that I could detect only longitudinal striate yellow fingernails and toenails and a dry scaling of the cuticle bed, such as the one I myself have had in the winter. I pointed out that these changes are seen in psoriasis on occasion as well as in Reiter syndrome. Some cases of dermatomyositis are preceded by psoriasiform eruptions. I have attended patients who developed a generalized erythroderma, one of whom developed hypothermic coma.1Having read with great enjoyment Dr. Samitz's article in the Archives,2 References 1. Yaffee HS: Hypothermic coma and exfoliative dermatitis . JAMA 207:367, 1969.Crossref 2. Samitz MH: Cuticular changes in dermatomyositis . Arch Dermatol 110:866-867, 1974.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1975

References