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DERMATOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

DERMATOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS Abstract May 21, 1956 To the Editor: The number of hours available for teaching during the four-year undergraduate medical course is static. Within this inflexible boundary, however, there is a continually changing pattern of medical education. Many departments are always pressing for a larger proportion of the available time because of the claimed relative importance of their special fields to the prospective physician. As part of this never-ending struggle for the time and the minds of undergraduate students there has developed a growing tendency in some medical schools to reduce the amount of time devoted to the teaching of dermatology and to relegate dermatology to the role of a minor specialty. This trend is particularly ominous for the future of medical practice, for, while most general practitioners will probably refrain from performing difficult surgical or technical procedures, all of them will see patients with diseases of the skin; many References 1. Read before the meeting of the Faculty of the University of Illinois College of Medicine, May 3, 1956. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

DERMATOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology , Volume 74 (5) – Nov 1, 1956

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1956.01550110096021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract May 21, 1956 To the Editor: The number of hours available for teaching during the four-year undergraduate medical course is static. Within this inflexible boundary, however, there is a continually changing pattern of medical education. Many departments are always pressing for a larger proportion of the available time because of the claimed relative importance of their special fields to the prospective physician. As part of this never-ending struggle for the time and the minds of undergraduate students there has developed a growing tendency in some medical schools to reduce the amount of time devoted to the teaching of dermatology and to relegate dermatology to the role of a minor specialty. This trend is particularly ominous for the future of medical practice, for, while most general practitioners will probably refrain from performing difficult surgical or technical procedures, all of them will see patients with diseases of the skin; many References 1. Read before the meeting of the Faculty of the University of Illinois College of Medicine, May 3, 1956.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1956

References