Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Dermatology and Comic Book Characters

Dermatology and Comic Book Characters Owing to its highly visual and colorful nature, the influence of dermatology may be found in almost any aspect of the ordinary life, even comic books. Here are some observations from the comic book world. Pigmentary Disorders Blue-Gray Skin The most famous blue-skinned characters are Mystique, the Beast, and Nightcrawler (son of Mystique). Several drugs and chemicals are associated with blue-gray pigmentation of the skin. These include hydroxychloroquine, amiodarone, and minocycline. Other causes are bismuth poisoning, mercury poisoning, chrysiasis, and argyria. Red Skin Of the many red-skinned characters, there are Daredevil, Red Skull, and the Red King of Planet Hulk. The causes of erythroderma include generalized drug eruptions, pityriasis rubra pilaris, severe atopic dermatitis, severe psoriasis, and Sézary syndrome. Orange Skin Orange skin may be attributed to hypercarotenemia and recalls the Thing. Green Skin The Hulk is perhaps the best loved and most emotionally conflicted character that exists in the comic book world. His green skin brings to mind several causes of obstructive jaundice, including tumors at the head of pancreas. Interestingly, intense green skin discoloration has also been reported in critically ill patients exposed to tube feeding dyes like FD&C Blue No. 1.1 Exposure to copper from swimming pools and jewelry may also result in green hair and skin. In the 16th through the 19th centuries, chlorosis was also associated with iron deficiency anemia—a phenomenon not seen in modern times since rapid diagnosis and treatment.1 Albinism The character Albino/Augusta Seger was described as a pale child who went on to possess powers of invisibility, inspired by albinism where there is partial or total absence of melanin pigment within melanocytes of the skin, hair follicles, and eyes.2 Poliosis X-men’s Rogue is remembered most for her trademark lock of white hair. Other Disorders of Skin and Hair Hypertrichosis Wolverine must have had hypertrichosis, informally known as the “Wolverine syndrome.” Acromegaly “My rings don’t fit anymore” is perhaps a well-known statement to the seasoned medical student reading the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine. The Hulk is an epitome of active acromegaly, exhibiting what must definitely be an increased shoe size, spade-like hands, hypertension, and excessive sweating. Phrynoderma The term phrynoderma was coined by Nicholls3 to describe the hyperkeratotic, toadlike appearance of the skin of undernourished laborers, not dissimilar to Mystique’s skin. Goltz Syndrome/Focal Dermal Hypoplasia Ectrodactyly, also referred to as “lobster-claw,” is one the features of Goltz syndrome, reminding us of the little-known villain Lobster Man. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome A hereditary connective tissue disorder that includes hypermobile joints, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome inspired the appearance of Mr Fantastic, who seems able to contort and stretch his body in infinite ways. Back to top Article Information Corresponding Author: Valencia Long, MBBS, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Rd, Singapore 119074 (valencialong@gmail.com). References 1. Hoenig L. Reflections on the Hulk’s green skin. Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):341.Google ScholarCrossref 2. Passeron T, Mantoux F, Ortonne JP. Genetic disorders of pigmentation. Clin Dermatol. 2005;23(1):56-67.PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. Nicholls L. Phrynoderma: a condition due to vitamin deficiency. Ind Med Gaz. 1933;68:681-687.Google Scholar http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Dermatology American Medical Association

Dermatology and Comic Book Characters

JAMA Dermatology , Volume 152 (6) – Jun 1, 2016

Dermatology and Comic Book Characters

Abstract

Owing to its highly visual and colorful nature, the influence of dermatology may be found in almost any aspect of the ordinary life, even comic books. Here are some observations from the comic book world. Pigmentary Disorders Blue-Gray Skin The most famous blue-skinned characters are Mystique, the Beast, and Nightcrawler (son of Mystique). Several drugs and chemicals are associated with blue-gray pigmentation of the skin. These include hydroxychloroquine, amiodarone, and minocycline. Other...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/dermatology-and-comic-book-characters-LI0fLcBYGo
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6068
eISSN
2168-6084
DOI
10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.5150
pmid
27276353
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Owing to its highly visual and colorful nature, the influence of dermatology may be found in almost any aspect of the ordinary life, even comic books. Here are some observations from the comic book world. Pigmentary Disorders Blue-Gray Skin The most famous blue-skinned characters are Mystique, the Beast, and Nightcrawler (son of Mystique). Several drugs and chemicals are associated with blue-gray pigmentation of the skin. These include hydroxychloroquine, amiodarone, and minocycline. Other causes are bismuth poisoning, mercury poisoning, chrysiasis, and argyria. Red Skin Of the many red-skinned characters, there are Daredevil, Red Skull, and the Red King of Planet Hulk. The causes of erythroderma include generalized drug eruptions, pityriasis rubra pilaris, severe atopic dermatitis, severe psoriasis, and Sézary syndrome. Orange Skin Orange skin may be attributed to hypercarotenemia and recalls the Thing. Green Skin The Hulk is perhaps the best loved and most emotionally conflicted character that exists in the comic book world. His green skin brings to mind several causes of obstructive jaundice, including tumors at the head of pancreas. Interestingly, intense green skin discoloration has also been reported in critically ill patients exposed to tube feeding dyes like FD&C Blue No. 1.1 Exposure to copper from swimming pools and jewelry may also result in green hair and skin. In the 16th through the 19th centuries, chlorosis was also associated with iron deficiency anemia—a phenomenon not seen in modern times since rapid diagnosis and treatment.1 Albinism The character Albino/Augusta Seger was described as a pale child who went on to possess powers of invisibility, inspired by albinism where there is partial or total absence of melanin pigment within melanocytes of the skin, hair follicles, and eyes.2 Poliosis X-men’s Rogue is remembered most for her trademark lock of white hair. Other Disorders of Skin and Hair Hypertrichosis Wolverine must have had hypertrichosis, informally known as the “Wolverine syndrome.” Acromegaly “My rings don’t fit anymore” is perhaps a well-known statement to the seasoned medical student reading the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine. The Hulk is an epitome of active acromegaly, exhibiting what must definitely be an increased shoe size, spade-like hands, hypertension, and excessive sweating. Phrynoderma The term phrynoderma was coined by Nicholls3 to describe the hyperkeratotic, toadlike appearance of the skin of undernourished laborers, not dissimilar to Mystique’s skin. Goltz Syndrome/Focal Dermal Hypoplasia Ectrodactyly, also referred to as “lobster-claw,” is one the features of Goltz syndrome, reminding us of the little-known villain Lobster Man. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome A hereditary connective tissue disorder that includes hypermobile joints, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome inspired the appearance of Mr Fantastic, who seems able to contort and stretch his body in infinite ways. Back to top Article Information Corresponding Author: Valencia Long, MBBS, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Rd, Singapore 119074 (valencialong@gmail.com). References 1. Hoenig L. Reflections on the Hulk’s green skin. Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(3):341.Google ScholarCrossref 2. Passeron T, Mantoux F, Ortonne JP. Genetic disorders of pigmentation. Clin Dermatol. 2005;23(1):56-67.PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. Nicholls L. Phrynoderma: a condition due to vitamin deficiency. Ind Med Gaz. 1933;68:681-687.Google Scholar

Journal

JAMA DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 2016

References