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DEMONSTRATION OF L. E. CELLS IN PERICARDIAL FLUID

DEMONSTRATION OF L. E. CELLS IN PERICARDIAL FLUID The value of the so-called lupus erythematosus (L. E.) inclusion phenomenon of bone marrow and blood as an aid in the diagnosis of acute disseminated lupus erythematosus has been amply demonstrated.1 It is the purpose of this paper to report a case of pericardial effusion due to acute disseminated lupus erythematosus in which the diagnosis was first intimated by the finding of L. E. cells in the Wright-stained buffy coat smears of the patient's oxalated pericardial fluid. Subsequently, large numbers of L. E. cells were demonstrated in buffy coat preparations made from an oxalated marrow specimen from the same patient. Response to cortisone therapy was striking and led to rapid resorption of the pericardial effusion. REPORT OF A CASE A 38-year-old white woman was well until May, 1950, at which time pain developed in the right thigh, with subsequent pain and swelling in the right leg and foot. In http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

DEMONSTRATION OF L. E. CELLS IN PERICARDIAL FLUID

JAMA , Volume 149 (2) – May 10, 1952

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1952.72930190010009e
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The value of the so-called lupus erythematosus (L. E.) inclusion phenomenon of bone marrow and blood as an aid in the diagnosis of acute disseminated lupus erythematosus has been amply demonstrated.1 It is the purpose of this paper to report a case of pericardial effusion due to acute disseminated lupus erythematosus in which the diagnosis was first intimated by the finding of L. E. cells in the Wright-stained buffy coat smears of the patient's oxalated pericardial fluid. Subsequently, large numbers of L. E. cells were demonstrated in buffy coat preparations made from an oxalated marrow specimen from the same patient. Response to cortisone therapy was striking and led to rapid resorption of the pericardial effusion. REPORT OF A CASE A 38-year-old white woman was well until May, 1950, at which time pain developed in the right thigh, with subsequent pain and swelling in the right leg and foot. In

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 10, 1952

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