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Deleading Houses: Dangers in the Dust

Deleading Houses: Dangers in the Dust Abstract The report of Amitai et al1 in this issue dealing with the intensification of lead exposure in children whose homes were being deleaded is timely and sobering. While this kind of occurrence has received little attention in pediatric circles, it is not surprising that it can happen. A number of distressing reports have appeared describing intense lead exposure among adults who were stripping, sanding, or burning off lead-containing paint from houses and bridges. The brisk and marked elevation of blood lead and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels in these patients suggests that the dosage of lead was high and absorption rapid. See also p 758. The means by which this exposure takes place is worthy of comment. Traditional dictum is that children get lead poisoning by eating paint chips. But do adult deleaders eat chips while they perform this unpleasant work? Most now wear masks or respirators. It is the dust generated References 1. Amitai Y, Graef JW, Brown MJ, et al: Hazards of 'deleading' homes of children with lead poisoning . AJDC 1987;141:758-760. 2. Sayre JW, Charney E, Vostal J, et al: House and hand dust as a potential source of childhood lead exposure . AJDC 1974;127:167-170. 3. Charney E, Kessler B, Farfel M, et al: Childhood lead poisoning: A controlled trial of the effect of dust control measures on blood lead levels . N Engl J Med 1983;309:1089-1093.Crossref 4. Lepow ML, Bruckman L, Rubino RA, et al: Role of airborne lead in increased body burden of lead in Hartford children. Environ Health Perspect 1974;7:99-104. 5. Sayre JW, Katzel MD: Household surface lead dust: Its accumulation in vacant homes . Environ Health Perspect 1979;29:179-182.Crossref 6. Sayre JW: Dust lead contribution to lead in children , in Lynam DR, Piantanida LG, Cole JF (eds): Environmental Lead . Orlando, Fla, Academic Press Inc, 1981, pp 23-40. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Deleading Houses: Dangers in the Dust

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460070029012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The report of Amitai et al1 in this issue dealing with the intensification of lead exposure in children whose homes were being deleaded is timely and sobering. While this kind of occurrence has received little attention in pediatric circles, it is not surprising that it can happen. A number of distressing reports have appeared describing intense lead exposure among adults who were stripping, sanding, or burning off lead-containing paint from houses and bridges. The brisk and marked elevation of blood lead and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels in these patients suggests that the dosage of lead was high and absorption rapid. See also p 758. The means by which this exposure takes place is worthy of comment. Traditional dictum is that children get lead poisoning by eating paint chips. But do adult deleaders eat chips while they perform this unpleasant work? Most now wear masks or respirators. It is the dust generated References 1. Amitai Y, Graef JW, Brown MJ, et al: Hazards of 'deleading' homes of children with lead poisoning . AJDC 1987;141:758-760. 2. Sayre JW, Charney E, Vostal J, et al: House and hand dust as a potential source of childhood lead exposure . AJDC 1974;127:167-170. 3. Charney E, Kessler B, Farfel M, et al: Childhood lead poisoning: A controlled trial of the effect of dust control measures on blood lead levels . N Engl J Med 1983;309:1089-1093.Crossref 4. Lepow ML, Bruckman L, Rubino RA, et al: Role of airborne lead in increased body burden of lead in Hartford children. Environ Health Perspect 1974;7:99-104. 5. Sayre JW, Katzel MD: Household surface lead dust: Its accumulation in vacant homes . Environ Health Perspect 1979;29:179-182.Crossref 6. Sayre JW: Dust lead contribution to lead in children , in Lynam DR, Piantanida LG, Cole JF (eds): Environmental Lead . Orlando, Fla, Academic Press Inc, 1981, pp 23-40.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1987

References