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Delayed Renin Release in Renal Infarction

Delayed Renin Release in Renal Infarction Abstract Little attention had been paid to J renin in clinical renal infarction until recently when we found a transient elevation of plasma renin activity (PRA) after attacks in three patients.1 We have had two additional experiences with renal infarction in a patient with a mitral prosthetic valve. The case is significant because (1) an isozyme analysis, which is generally thought to be most useful in organ diagnosis, did not help because of the multiple sources of an increased level of serum lactic dehydrogenase (SLDH) possibly involved. Here, the determination of PRA was useful and thus proved to be superior as a diagnostic aid in renal infarction. (2) This case provided an opportunity to observe the time course of the elevation of PRA along with that of the other serum enzymes, and offered a clue to the mechanism of renin release in this condition. Patient Summary A 21-year-old woman has References 1. Arakawa K, Torii S, Naito S, et al: Plasma renin activity as a more specific diagnostic aid for renal infarction. Arch Intern Med 125:830-834, 1970.Crossref 2. Walsh JR, Starr A, Ritzmann LW: Intravascular hemolysis in patients with prosthetic valves and valvular heart disease. Circulation 49,50( (suppl 1) ):135-140, 1969. 3. Bodansky 0: Diagnostic biochemistry and clinical medicine: Facts and fallacies. Clin Chem 9:1-18, 1963. 4. Tobian L: Relationship of juxtaglomerular apparatus to renin and angiotensin. Circulation 25:189-192, 1962.Crossref 5. Gross F, Brunner H, Ziegler M: Renin-angiotensin system, aldosterone and sodium balance. Recent Progr Hormone Res 21:119-177, 1965. 6. Arakawa K, Minohara A, Uemura N, et al: Plasma renin activity in hypertension and renal infarction. Jap J Med 9:287-288, 1970. 7. Huvos A, Yagi S, Mannick JA, et al: Stimulation of renin secretion by hydralazine: II. Studies in renovascular hypertension. Circulation 32( (suppl 2) ):118, 1965. 8. Omae T, Tanaka K: Release of pressor substances from infarcted kidneys in rats: I. Effect of chronic administration of hydralazine. Jap Heart J 12:79-83, 1971.Crossref 9. LaDue JS, Wrobleski F, Karmen A: Serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase activity in human acute transmural myocardial infarction. Science 20:497-499, 1954.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1972.00320060106013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Little attention had been paid to J renin in clinical renal infarction until recently when we found a transient elevation of plasma renin activity (PRA) after attacks in three patients.1 We have had two additional experiences with renal infarction in a patient with a mitral prosthetic valve. The case is significant because (1) an isozyme analysis, which is generally thought to be most useful in organ diagnosis, did not help because of the multiple sources of an increased level of serum lactic dehydrogenase (SLDH) possibly involved. Here, the determination of PRA was useful and thus proved to be superior as a diagnostic aid in renal infarction. (2) This case provided an opportunity to observe the time course of the elevation of PRA along with that of the other serum enzymes, and offered a clue to the mechanism of renin release in this condition. Patient Summary A 21-year-old woman has References 1. Arakawa K, Torii S, Naito S, et al: Plasma renin activity as a more specific diagnostic aid for renal infarction. Arch Intern Med 125:830-834, 1970.Crossref 2. Walsh JR, Starr A, Ritzmann LW: Intravascular hemolysis in patients with prosthetic valves and valvular heart disease. Circulation 49,50( (suppl 1) ):135-140, 1969. 3. Bodansky 0: Diagnostic biochemistry and clinical medicine: Facts and fallacies. Clin Chem 9:1-18, 1963. 4. Tobian L: Relationship of juxtaglomerular apparatus to renin and angiotensin. Circulation 25:189-192, 1962.Crossref 5. Gross F, Brunner H, Ziegler M: Renin-angiotensin system, aldosterone and sodium balance. Recent Progr Hormone Res 21:119-177, 1965. 6. Arakawa K, Minohara A, Uemura N, et al: Plasma renin activity in hypertension and renal infarction. Jap J Med 9:287-288, 1970. 7. Huvos A, Yagi S, Mannick JA, et al: Stimulation of renin secretion by hydralazine: II. Studies in renovascular hypertension. Circulation 32( (suppl 2) ):118, 1965. 8. Omae T, Tanaka K: Release of pressor substances from infarcted kidneys in rats: I. Effect of chronic administration of hydralazine. Jap Heart J 12:79-83, 1971.Crossref 9. LaDue JS, Wrobleski F, Karmen A: Serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase activity in human acute transmural myocardial infarction. Science 20:497-499, 1954.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1972

References