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Defining the Right State for a Will Rogers Phenomenon in Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

Defining the Right State for a Will Rogers Phenomenon in Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer Letters tinued at that time. This is indeed an excellent point. In our tion With Pelvic Lymph Node or Prostate Bed Only Radio- study, 53% of patients received second-line therapy; while 35% therapy (SPPORT) trial demonstrated, the prostate bed is still of these patients received second-line chemotherapy alone, the main site of relapse after prostatectomy. Pollack et al ob- 65% continued HAI-directed therapy with a different sys- served, in a randomized trial of salvage radiotherapy per- temic chemotherapy, likely contributing to continued con- formed on 1792 patients who had undergone prostatectomy, trol of the primary liver tumor and the observed prolonged OS. that 5 years after the treatment, progression-free survival rates To fully address these points, we have initiated a randomized were 71.1% for prostate bed–only radiotherapy, 82.7% for pros- clinical trial comparing locoregional therapy with standard tate bed radiotherapy plus short-term (4-6 months) andro- chemotherapy that will begin accruing patients in the spring gen deprivation therapy, and 89.1% for prostate bed radio- of 2020. therapy plus short-term androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic lymph node radiotherapy. Andrea Cercek, MD The optimal results of the RTOG 0534 trial were obtained William R. Jarnagin, MD using standard imaging. Thus, some patients http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Oncology American Medical Association

Defining the Right State for a Will Rogers Phenomenon in Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2020 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2374-2437
eISSN
2374-2445
DOI
10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.0574
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letters tinued at that time. This is indeed an excellent point. In our tion With Pelvic Lymph Node or Prostate Bed Only Radio- study, 53% of patients received second-line therapy; while 35% therapy (SPPORT) trial demonstrated, the prostate bed is still of these patients received second-line chemotherapy alone, the main site of relapse after prostatectomy. Pollack et al ob- 65% continued HAI-directed therapy with a different sys- served, in a randomized trial of salvage radiotherapy per- temic chemotherapy, likely contributing to continued con- formed on 1792 patients who had undergone prostatectomy, trol of the primary liver tumor and the observed prolonged OS. that 5 years after the treatment, progression-free survival rates To fully address these points, we have initiated a randomized were 71.1% for prostate bed–only radiotherapy, 82.7% for pros- clinical trial comparing locoregional therapy with standard tate bed radiotherapy plus short-term (4-6 months) andro- chemotherapy that will begin accruing patients in the spring gen deprivation therapy, and 89.1% for prostate bed radio- of 2020. therapy plus short-term androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic lymph node radiotherapy. Andrea Cercek, MD The optimal results of the RTOG 0534 trial were obtained William R. Jarnagin, MD using standard imaging. Thus, some patients

Journal

JAMA OncologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 16, 2020

References