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Deaths From Melanoma—United States, 1973-1992

Deaths From Melanoma—United States, 1973-1992 Abstract Approximately three fourths of all skin cancer-associated deaths are caused by melanoma. During 1973-1991, the incidence of melanoma increased approximately 4% each year.1 In addition, the incidence of melanoma is increasing faster than that of any other cancer.2 To characterize the distribution of deaths from melanoma in the United States, CDC analyzed national mortality data for 1973 through 1992. This report summarizes the results of that analysis. Decedents for whom the underlying cause of death was melanoma (International Classification of Diseases, Adapted, Ninth Revision, codes 172.0-172.9) were identified from public-use, mortality data tapes from 1973 through 1992.3 The denominators for rate calculations were derived from U.S. census population estimates.4,5 Rates were directly standardized to the age distribution of the 1970 U.S. population and were analyzed by state, age group, sex, year, and race. To increase the precision of the rates presented, race was characterized as white References 1. The Ultraviolet Index, provided by the National Weather Service, is broadcast by television and print media in 58 U.S. cities and provides information on the intensity of the sun's rays during the solar noon hour. The index ranges from 0 to 10+ with greater than or equal to 10 indicating the most intense sunlight. 2. American Cancer Society. Cancer facts and figures, 1995 . Atlanta: American Cancer Society, 1995; publication no. 5008.95. 3. Koh HK. Cutaneous melanoma . N Engl J Med 1991;325:171-82.Crossref 4. NCHS. Vital statistics mortality data, underlying cause of death, 1973-1992 . Hyattsville, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, CDC, 1973-1992. 5. Bureau of the Census. 1970-1989 Intercensal population estimates by race, sex, and age . Washington, DC: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, nd. 6. Irwin R. 1990-1992 Postcensal population estimates by race, sex, and age . Alexandria, Virginia: Demo-Detail, 1993. 7. Ries LAG, Miller BA, Hankey BF, Kosary CL, Harras A, Edwards BK, eds. SEER cancer statistics review, 1973-1991: tables and graphs . Bethesda, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, 1994; publication no. (NIH)94-2789. 8. Hartman AM, Goldstein AM. Melanoma of the skin . In: Miller BA, Ries LAG, Hankey BF, et al., eds. SEER cancer statistics review, 1973-1990 . Bethesda, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, 1993; publication no. (NIH)93-2789. 9. Marks R, Hill D, eds. The public health approach to melanoma control: prevention and early detection . Geneva: International Union Against Cancer, 1992. 10. Wiley HE. Ways to protect children from sun damage . The Skin Cancer Foundation Journal 1994; 12:41,98. 11. Public Health Service. Healthy people 2000: national health promotion and disease prevention objectives . Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 1991; DHHS publication no. (PHS)91-50213. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Deaths From Melanoma—United States, 1973-1992

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 131 (7) – Jul 1, 1995

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1995.01690190022003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Approximately three fourths of all skin cancer-associated deaths are caused by melanoma. During 1973-1991, the incidence of melanoma increased approximately 4% each year.1 In addition, the incidence of melanoma is increasing faster than that of any other cancer.2 To characterize the distribution of deaths from melanoma in the United States, CDC analyzed national mortality data for 1973 through 1992. This report summarizes the results of that analysis. Decedents for whom the underlying cause of death was melanoma (International Classification of Diseases, Adapted, Ninth Revision, codes 172.0-172.9) were identified from public-use, mortality data tapes from 1973 through 1992.3 The denominators for rate calculations were derived from U.S. census population estimates.4,5 Rates were directly standardized to the age distribution of the 1970 U.S. population and were analyzed by state, age group, sex, year, and race. To increase the precision of the rates presented, race was characterized as white References 1. The Ultraviolet Index, provided by the National Weather Service, is broadcast by television and print media in 58 U.S. cities and provides information on the intensity of the sun's rays during the solar noon hour. The index ranges from 0 to 10+ with greater than or equal to 10 indicating the most intense sunlight. 2. American Cancer Society. Cancer facts and figures, 1995 . Atlanta: American Cancer Society, 1995; publication no. 5008.95. 3. Koh HK. Cutaneous melanoma . N Engl J Med 1991;325:171-82.Crossref 4. NCHS. Vital statistics mortality data, underlying cause of death, 1973-1992 . Hyattsville, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, CDC, 1973-1992. 5. Bureau of the Census. 1970-1989 Intercensal population estimates by race, sex, and age . Washington, DC: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, nd. 6. Irwin R. 1990-1992 Postcensal population estimates by race, sex, and age . Alexandria, Virginia: Demo-Detail, 1993. 7. Ries LAG, Miller BA, Hankey BF, Kosary CL, Harras A, Edwards BK, eds. SEER cancer statistics review, 1973-1991: tables and graphs . Bethesda, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, 1994; publication no. (NIH)94-2789. 8. Hartman AM, Goldstein AM. Melanoma of the skin . In: Miller BA, Ries LAG, Hankey BF, et al., eds. SEER cancer statistics review, 1973-1990 . Bethesda, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, 1993; publication no. (NIH)93-2789. 9. Marks R, Hill D, eds. The public health approach to melanoma control: prevention and early detection . Geneva: International Union Against Cancer, 1992. 10. Wiley HE. Ways to protect children from sun damage . The Skin Cancer Foundation Journal 1994; 12:41,98. 11. Public Health Service. Healthy people 2000: national health promotion and disease prevention objectives . Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 1991; DHHS publication no. (PHS)91-50213.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1995

References