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Dangers of Steroid Treatment in Toxoplasmosis: Periocular Injections and Systemic Therapy

Dangers of Steroid Treatment in Toxoplasmosis: Periocular Injections and Systemic Therapy This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract There is a general tendency among ophthalmologists to treat all forms of uveitis with corticosteroids. Patients with various inflammations of the uveal tract are usually treated with steroids first and investigated later. These patients are subjected to an investigation of the cause of their uveitis only when corticosteroids have failed to control their disease. Even when the cause of their uveitis is known or strongly suspected, such patients often fail to receive appropriate antimicrobial therapy during the period that their inflammatory responses are being suppressed by corticosteroids or by other immunosuppressive agents. The article by Nicholson and Wolchok in this issue of the Archives illustrates the folly of such treatment programs. The patient described by them was the victim of some unknown lymphoproliferative disorder. She was treated with systemically administered corticosteroids for this disorder, and, while receiving this oral corticosteroid therapy, developed widespread paravascular inflammatory lesions of both retinae. Since http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Dangers of Steroid Treatment in Toxoplasmosis: Periocular Injections and Systemic Therapy

Dangers of Steroid Treatment in Toxoplasmosis: Periocular Injections and Systemic Therapy

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract There is a general tendency among ophthalmologists to treat all forms of uveitis with corticosteroids. Patients with various inflammations of the uveal tract are usually treated with steroids first and investigated later. These patients are subjected to an investigation of the cause of their uveitis only when corticosteroids have failed to control...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1976.03910030093001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract There is a general tendency among ophthalmologists to treat all forms of uveitis with corticosteroids. Patients with various inflammations of the uveal tract are usually treated with steroids first and investigated later. These patients are subjected to an investigation of the cause of their uveitis only when corticosteroids have failed to control their disease. Even when the cause of their uveitis is known or strongly suspected, such patients often fail to receive appropriate antimicrobial therapy during the period that their inflammatory responses are being suppressed by corticosteroids or by other immunosuppressive agents. The article by Nicholson and Wolchok in this issue of the Archives illustrates the folly of such treatment programs. The patient described by them was the victim of some unknown lymphoproliferative disorder. She was treated with systemically administered corticosteroids for this disorder, and, while receiving this oral corticosteroid therapy, developed widespread paravascular inflammatory lesions of both retinae. Since

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1976

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