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Dèjà Vu in Psychiatric and Neurosurgical Patients

Dèjà Vu in Psychiatric and Neurosurgical Patients Abstract We have all some experience of a feeling which comes over us occasionally, of what we are saying and doing having been said or done before, in a remote time—of our having been surrounded dim ages ago, by the same faces, objects, and circumstances—of our knowing perfectly what will be said next, as if we suddenly remembered it. —David Copperfield THE ABOVE QUOTATION, reproduced from an early article by Hughlings Jackson, seems to define what has been called dèjà vu, or as Jackson called it, "reminiscense."1 He described this "intellectual aura" occurring during the onset of psychomotor-epileptic seizures as early as 1880. However, he was careful to mention that this aura occurred occasionally in "healthy people."2 In fact, he mentioned reminiscence of this type being described by such nonscientists as Tennyson, Coleridge, and, as above, Dickens.1 In Jackson's article a References 1. Jackson, J.H.: On a Particular Variety of Epilepsy , Brain 11:179-207, 1888.Crossref 2. Jackson, J.H.: On Right or Left Sided Spasm at the Onset of Epileptic Paroxysmals, and on Crude Sensations, Warnings and Elaborate Mental States , Brain 3:192-206, 1880.Crossref 3. Cole, M., and Zangwill, O.L.: Dèjà Vu in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy , J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiat 26:37-38, 1963.Crossref 4. Chapman, A.H. and Mensh, I.N.: Dèjà Vu Experience and Conscious Fantasy in Adults , Psychiat Quart ( (suppl) ) 25-26:163-175, 1951-1952. 5. Hill, A.B.: Principles of Medical Statistics , New York: Oxford University Press, 1961, pp 133-143. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of General Psychiatry American Medical Association

Dèjà Vu in Psychiatric and Neurosurgical Patients

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1967 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-990X
eISSN
1598-3636
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.1967.01730290110014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract We have all some experience of a feeling which comes over us occasionally, of what we are saying and doing having been said or done before, in a remote time—of our having been surrounded dim ages ago, by the same faces, objects, and circumstances—of our knowing perfectly what will be said next, as if we suddenly remembered it. —David Copperfield THE ABOVE QUOTATION, reproduced from an early article by Hughlings Jackson, seems to define what has been called dèjà vu, or as Jackson called it, "reminiscense."1 He described this "intellectual aura" occurring during the onset of psychomotor-epileptic seizures as early as 1880. However, he was careful to mention that this aura occurred occasionally in "healthy people."2 In fact, he mentioned reminiscence of this type being described by such nonscientists as Tennyson, Coleridge, and, as above, Dickens.1 In Jackson's article a References 1. Jackson, J.H.: On a Particular Variety of Epilepsy , Brain 11:179-207, 1888.Crossref 2. Jackson, J.H.: On Right or Left Sided Spasm at the Onset of Epileptic Paroxysmals, and on Crude Sensations, Warnings and Elaborate Mental States , Brain 3:192-206, 1880.Crossref 3. Cole, M., and Zangwill, O.L.: Dèjà Vu in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy , J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiat 26:37-38, 1963.Crossref 4. Chapman, A.H. and Mensh, I.N.: Dèjà Vu Experience and Conscious Fantasy in Adults , Psychiat Quart ( (suppl) ) 25-26:163-175, 1951-1952. 5. Hill, A.B.: Principles of Medical Statistics , New York: Oxford University Press, 1961, pp 133-143.

Journal

Archives of General PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1967

References

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