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CYCLOPIA IN A NEW-BORN KITTEN: ANATOMIC FINDINGS

CYCLOPIA IN A NEW-BORN KITTEN: ANATOMIC FINDINGS Abstract The term "cyclops," derived from the Greek κυκγος + ὥψ, meaning "round-eyed," is truly appropriate to the present specimen. As can be observed in figure 1, the relatively large eyeball is located in the midline, entirely external to the underlying cranium, and is not covered by eyelids. Seefelder in 1930 reviewed the literature and briefly described the principal facts of cyclopia.1 He stated that the condition strictly belongs to the malformations of the head, since the changes simultaneously involve the anterior part of the brain and the nose as well as the eye. Cyclopia is not an especially rare defect. Nor is it limited to man, for it occurs also in other mammals (most frequently in the pig) as well as in birds, amphibians and fishes. The anomaly particularly affects the part of the brain and of the skull lying between the two ocular anlagen and either partly or, exceptionally, References 1. Seefelder, R., in Schieck, F., and Brückner, A.: Kurzes Handbuch der Ophthalmologie , 1930, vol. 1, p. 559. 2. Meckel, Johann Friedrich: Regarding the Coalescing Formations , Arch. f. Anat. u. Physiol. 1:238, 1826. 3. Huschke, E.: The First Development of the Eye and Its Associated Cyclopia , Arch. f. Anat. u. Physiol. 6:1, 1832. 4. Stockard, Charles R.: The Development of Artificially Produced Cyclopean Fish , J. Exper. Zoöl. 6:285, 1909.Crossref 5. Fischel, Alfred: The Normal and Abnormal Development of the Eye: The Manner and Position of the First Eye-Analge, as Well as the Formal and Causal Origin of Cyclopia , Arch. f. Entwcklngsmech. d. Organ. 49:383, 1921.Crossref 6. Jaensch, P. A.: The Formation of Folds and Rosettes in the Retina , Arch. f. Ophth. 116:464, 1926. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

CYCLOPIA IN A NEW-BORN KITTEN: ANATOMIC FINDINGS

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 15 (6) – Jun 1, 1936

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1936 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1936.00840180042004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The term "cyclops," derived from the Greek κυκγος + ὥψ, meaning "round-eyed," is truly appropriate to the present specimen. As can be observed in figure 1, the relatively large eyeball is located in the midline, entirely external to the underlying cranium, and is not covered by eyelids. Seefelder in 1930 reviewed the literature and briefly described the principal facts of cyclopia.1 He stated that the condition strictly belongs to the malformations of the head, since the changes simultaneously involve the anterior part of the brain and the nose as well as the eye. Cyclopia is not an especially rare defect. Nor is it limited to man, for it occurs also in other mammals (most frequently in the pig) as well as in birds, amphibians and fishes. The anomaly particularly affects the part of the brain and of the skull lying between the two ocular anlagen and either partly or, exceptionally, References 1. Seefelder, R., in Schieck, F., and Brückner, A.: Kurzes Handbuch der Ophthalmologie , 1930, vol. 1, p. 559. 2. Meckel, Johann Friedrich: Regarding the Coalescing Formations , Arch. f. Anat. u. Physiol. 1:238, 1826. 3. Huschke, E.: The First Development of the Eye and Its Associated Cyclopia , Arch. f. Anat. u. Physiol. 6:1, 1832. 4. Stockard, Charles R.: The Development of Artificially Produced Cyclopean Fish , J. Exper. Zoöl. 6:285, 1909.Crossref 5. Fischel, Alfred: The Normal and Abnormal Development of the Eye: The Manner and Position of the First Eye-Analge, as Well as the Formal and Causal Origin of Cyclopia , Arch. f. Entwcklngsmech. d. Organ. 49:383, 1921.Crossref 6. Jaensch, P. A.: The Formation of Folds and Rosettes in the Retina , Arch. f. Ophth. 116:464, 1926.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1936

References

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