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CUTANEOUS PAPILLOMATOSIS: PAPILLOMATOSE CONFLUENTE ET RETICULEE

CUTANEOUS PAPILLOMATOSIS: PAPILLOMATOSE CONFLUENTE ET RETICULEE Abstract An interesting article entitled "New Forms of Papillomatosis'' was published in 1932 by Gougerot and Carteaud,1 of France. Since the American literature contains no reference2 to dermatoses of this kind, we believe that a report of an example of a rare dermatosis belonging in this group is warranted. Gougerot and Carteaud pointed out that the literature concerning cutaneous papillomatoses reveals an astonishingly meager amount of information, that such eruptions are rare, that they are not generally recognized as forming a self-sustained group and that they are confused with verrucose proliferative dermatoses. They stated further that in their opinion there was a need for segregation and identification—at least from the clinical aspect—of such a group of rare dermatoses. They described and illustrated with photographs three groups, as follows: Group I. Punctate, pigmented, verrucous papillomatosis. Group II. Confluent and reticulated papillomatosis. Group III. Nummular and confluent papillomatosis. The patient whose References 1. Gougerot, H., and Carteaud, A.: New Forms of Papillomatosis , Arch. f. Dermat. u. Syph. 165:232, 1932.Crossref 2. Gougerot and Carteaud's article in The Year Book of Dermatology and Syphilology , Chicago, The Year Book Publishers, Inc., 1932, p. 174 3. A remarkable complication, in the nature of a coexisting dermatosis, and one seemingly independent of the papillomatosis consisted of the following clinical manifestations: On the middle region of the anterior aspect of both arms (more marked on the right) were well defined groups of round glistening ivory yellow papules the size of the head of a small pin (fig. 1) arranged in longitudinal linear configuration. They were absent on other parts of the body. The patient noticed that they were quite different from her other eruptions, but she did not know how long they had been present. Clinically these papules were indistinguishable from lichen nitidus. Histologically, however, their structure was definitely tuberculoid. 4. Variations in the histologic structure were summarized by Gougerot and Carteaud in the description of the three groups of papillomatosis they studied. The chief features were as follows: (1) there was lamellated hyperkeratosis without abscess formation; (2) a moderate grade of papillomatosis was present; (3) the epidermis was sinuous and the ree somewhat atrophic; (4)the basal cell layer did not present uniform palisade oniguration; the prickle cells had lost their intercellular filaments; the stratum granulosum was in part absent; in other parts it was composed of a single row of flattened cells, oor in keratohyalin; (5) there were moderate perviascular infiltrates in the cutis; (6) the hair follicles and sebaceous glands were unaltered (they were atrophic in our case); (7) the sweat glands were absent; (8) the elastica was unchanged in the region of the papillary bodies and frayed in the deeper layers of cutis, forming ort, fien stumps, which, however, retained their tinctorial qualities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology American Medical Association

CUTANEOUS PAPILLOMATOSIS: PAPILLOMATOSE CONFLUENTE ET RETICULEE

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1937 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6029
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1937.01480030002001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract An interesting article entitled "New Forms of Papillomatosis'' was published in 1932 by Gougerot and Carteaud,1 of France. Since the American literature contains no reference2 to dermatoses of this kind, we believe that a report of an example of a rare dermatosis belonging in this group is warranted. Gougerot and Carteaud pointed out that the literature concerning cutaneous papillomatoses reveals an astonishingly meager amount of information, that such eruptions are rare, that they are not generally recognized as forming a self-sustained group and that they are confused with verrucose proliferative dermatoses. They stated further that in their opinion there was a need for segregation and identification—at least from the clinical aspect—of such a group of rare dermatoses. They described and illustrated with photographs three groups, as follows: Group I. Punctate, pigmented, verrucous papillomatosis. Group II. Confluent and reticulated papillomatosis. Group III. Nummular and confluent papillomatosis. The patient whose References 1. Gougerot, H., and Carteaud, A.: New Forms of Papillomatosis , Arch. f. Dermat. u. Syph. 165:232, 1932.Crossref 2. Gougerot and Carteaud's article in The Year Book of Dermatology and Syphilology , Chicago, The Year Book Publishers, Inc., 1932, p. 174 3. A remarkable complication, in the nature of a coexisting dermatosis, and one seemingly independent of the papillomatosis consisted of the following clinical manifestations: On the middle region of the anterior aspect of both arms (more marked on the right) were well defined groups of round glistening ivory yellow papules the size of the head of a small pin (fig. 1) arranged in longitudinal linear configuration. They were absent on other parts of the body. The patient noticed that they were quite different from her other eruptions, but she did not know how long they had been present. Clinically these papules were indistinguishable from lichen nitidus. Histologically, however, their structure was definitely tuberculoid. 4. Variations in the histologic structure were summarized by Gougerot and Carteaud in the description of the three groups of papillomatosis they studied. The chief features were as follows: (1) there was lamellated hyperkeratosis without abscess formation; (2) a moderate grade of papillomatosis was present; (3) the epidermis was sinuous and the ree somewhat atrophic; (4)the basal cell layer did not present uniform palisade oniguration; the prickle cells had lost their intercellular filaments; the stratum granulosum was in part absent; in other parts it was composed of a single row of flattened cells, oor in keratohyalin; (5) there were moderate perviascular infiltrates in the cutis; (6) the hair follicles and sebaceous glands were unaltered (they were atrophic in our case); (7) the sweat glands were absent; (8) the elastica was unchanged in the region of the papillary bodies and frayed in the deeper layers of cutis, forming ort, fien stumps, which, however, retained their tinctorial qualities.

Journal

Archives of Dermatology and SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1937

References