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CSF Pleocytosis-Reply

CSF Pleocytosis-Reply Abstract —The case reported by Dr Whelan of meningococcemia with an acellular CSF that showed growth of N meningitidis is certainly relevant to our series of bacterial meningitis in the absence of CSF pleocytosis. Although his case would not have fulfilled the strictest criteria for inclusion in our series (because there was no clinical, laboratory, or pathologic evidence of meningitis besides the positive results of the CSF and blood cultures), it seems likely that meningitis was developing in his patient. We found no such patient in our series of adults, but did find a 7-year-old child with meningococcemia and a normal CSF positive for N meningitidis on culture in our series of children (D.B.F. and K.M.R., unpublished data). Others have found this phenomenon with N meningitidis in children.1 All of these patients had clinical evidence of meningococcemia, meningitis, or both. Swartz and Dodge2 had one patient with N References 1. Smales OR, Rutter NB: Difficulties in diagnosing meningococcal meningitis in children. Br Med J 1979;1:588.Crossref 2. Swartz MN, Dodge PR: Bacterial meningitis—A review of selected aspects: I. General clinical features, special problems, and unusual meningeal reactions mimicking bacterial meningitis. N Engl J Med 1965;272:779-787.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1982.00340160223042
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract —The case reported by Dr Whelan of meningococcemia with an acellular CSF that showed growth of N meningitidis is certainly relevant to our series of bacterial meningitis in the absence of CSF pleocytosis. Although his case would not have fulfilled the strictest criteria for inclusion in our series (because there was no clinical, laboratory, or pathologic evidence of meningitis besides the positive results of the CSF and blood cultures), it seems likely that meningitis was developing in his patient. We found no such patient in our series of adults, but did find a 7-year-old child with meningococcemia and a normal CSF positive for N meningitidis on culture in our series of children (D.B.F. and K.M.R., unpublished data). Others have found this phenomenon with N meningitidis in children.1 All of these patients had clinical evidence of meningococcemia, meningitis, or both. Swartz and Dodge2 had one patient with N References 1. Smales OR, Rutter NB: Difficulties in diagnosing meningococcal meningitis in children. Br Med J 1979;1:588.Crossref 2. Swartz MN, Dodge PR: Bacterial meningitis—A review of selected aspects: I. General clinical features, special problems, and unusual meningeal reactions mimicking bacterial meningitis. N Engl J Med 1965;272:779-787.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1982

References