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Cryoglobulinemia: Rationale and Results of Bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) Therapy

Cryoglobulinemia: Rationale and Results of Bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) Therapy Abstract Cryoglobulin is an abnormal serum protein which precipitates or gels on cooling. Small quantities of cryoglobulin have been found in the sera of patients with many disparate diseases,1 including subacute bacterial endocarditis, hepatic cirrhosis, blood dyscrasias, and the collagen diseases, but clinically significant amounts of cryoglobulin occur in only two conditions: multiple myeloma and "essential" cryoglobulinemia. In the test tube the serum from a cryoglobulinemic patient will show a flocculent white precipitate or opaque gelification when the temperature is reduced to 5 C. The rapidity of the solidification is proportional to the concentration of cryoglobulin and is graded from 1+ to 3+ on this basis. At cryoglobulin concentrations of 25 mg. per 100 cc. and over (3+), precipitation occurs immediately on chilling and may occur before the serum is cooled to below room temperature.1 Repeated cooling and warming of cryoglobulinemic serum results in the eventual loss of the References 1. Material made available by Dr. Samuel Ayers III. 2. Courtesy of Dr. Delbert R. Dickson. 3. Lerner, A. B.; Barnum, C. P., and Watson, C. J.: Studies of Cryoglobulins: II. The Spontaneous Precipitation of Protein from Serum at 5° C in Various Disease States , Am. J. M. Sc. 214:416-421 ( (Oct.) ) 1947.Crossref 4. Putnam, F. W.: Abnormal Human Serum Globulins , Science 122:275-277 ( (Aug. 12) ) 1955.Crossref 5. Volpé, R.; Bruce-Robertson, A.; Fletcher, A. A., and Charles W. B.: Essential Cryoglobulinemia: Review of the Literature and Report of a Case Treated with ACTH and Cortisone , Am. J. Med. 20:533-553 ( (April) ) 1956.Crossref 6. Mackay, I. R.; Eriksen, N.; Motulsky, A. G., and Volwiler, W.: Cryo- and Macroglobulinemia: Electrophoretic, Ultracentrifugal and Clinical Studies , Am. J. Med. 20:564-587 ( (April) ) 1956.Crossref 7. Wirtschafter, Z. T.; Williams, D. W., and Gaulden, E. C.: Cryoproteinemia: An Immunologic Phenomenon? Electrophoretic Analysis of Serum Proteins of a Patient with Cold Allergy , Am. J. Med. 20:624-630 ( (April) ) 1956.Crossref 8. Henstell, H. H., and Feinstein, M.: New Theory of Interference in Clotting Mechanism by Abnormal Plasma Proteins , Science 123:1118 ( (June 22) ) 1956.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Cryoglobulinemia: Rationale and Results of Bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) Therapy

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1957 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0888-2479
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1957.00260090127017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Cryoglobulin is an abnormal serum protein which precipitates or gels on cooling. Small quantities of cryoglobulin have been found in the sera of patients with many disparate diseases,1 including subacute bacterial endocarditis, hepatic cirrhosis, blood dyscrasias, and the collagen diseases, but clinically significant amounts of cryoglobulin occur in only two conditions: multiple myeloma and "essential" cryoglobulinemia. In the test tube the serum from a cryoglobulinemic patient will show a flocculent white precipitate or opaque gelification when the temperature is reduced to 5 C. The rapidity of the solidification is proportional to the concentration of cryoglobulin and is graded from 1+ to 3+ on this basis. At cryoglobulin concentrations of 25 mg. per 100 cc. and over (3+), precipitation occurs immediately on chilling and may occur before the serum is cooled to below room temperature.1 Repeated cooling and warming of cryoglobulinemic serum results in the eventual loss of the References 1. Material made available by Dr. Samuel Ayers III. 2. Courtesy of Dr. Delbert R. Dickson. 3. Lerner, A. B.; Barnum, C. P., and Watson, C. J.: Studies of Cryoglobulins: II. The Spontaneous Precipitation of Protein from Serum at 5° C in Various Disease States , Am. J. M. Sc. 214:416-421 ( (Oct.) ) 1947.Crossref 4. Putnam, F. W.: Abnormal Human Serum Globulins , Science 122:275-277 ( (Aug. 12) ) 1955.Crossref 5. Volpé, R.; Bruce-Robertson, A.; Fletcher, A. A., and Charles W. B.: Essential Cryoglobulinemia: Review of the Literature and Report of a Case Treated with ACTH and Cortisone , Am. J. Med. 20:533-553 ( (April) ) 1956.Crossref 6. Mackay, I. R.; Eriksen, N.; Motulsky, A. G., and Volwiler, W.: Cryo- and Macroglobulinemia: Electrophoretic, Ultracentrifugal and Clinical Studies , Am. J. Med. 20:564-587 ( (April) ) 1956.Crossref 7. Wirtschafter, Z. T.; Williams, D. W., and Gaulden, E. C.: Cryoproteinemia: An Immunologic Phenomenon? Electrophoretic Analysis of Serum Proteins of a Patient with Cold Allergy , Am. J. Med. 20:624-630 ( (April) ) 1956.Crossref 8. Henstell, H. H., and Feinstein, M.: New Theory of Interference in Clotting Mechanism by Abnormal Plasma Proteins , Science 123:1118 ( (June 22) ) 1956.Crossref

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1957

References