Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

CRITERIA FOR MANAGEMENT OF MELANOSIS

CRITERIA FOR MANAGEMENT OF MELANOSIS This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor: Your Feature Photo captioned "Cancerous Melanosis" in the March issue followed by your editorial "Primum non nocere" in the April issue have prompted me to take up the pen. The editorial quite properly suggests that ophthalmic surgeons, along with many other physicians fighting cancer, have been guilty of excessive surgery. The two lesions specifically cited as examples of pseudocancerous conditions leading to unnecessary concern and to radical operations were nodular fasciitis and keratoacanthoma. While I agree that these lesions are sometimes treated more vigorously than is necessary, I doubt that very many exenterations have been done for them. On the other hand, I know that many have been performed after a diagnosis of cancerous melanosis has been made. A genuine malignant melanoma arising in an area of acquired melanosis of the conjunctiva carries a poor prognosis, and I will not quarrel here with those who believe that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

CRITERIA FOR MANAGEMENT OF MELANOSIS

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 76 (2) – Aug 1, 1966

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/criteria-for-management-of-melanosis-GYufSl8HnM
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1966.03850010309025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor: Your Feature Photo captioned "Cancerous Melanosis" in the March issue followed by your editorial "Primum non nocere" in the April issue have prompted me to take up the pen. The editorial quite properly suggests that ophthalmic surgeons, along with many other physicians fighting cancer, have been guilty of excessive surgery. The two lesions specifically cited as examples of pseudocancerous conditions leading to unnecessary concern and to radical operations were nodular fasciitis and keratoacanthoma. While I agree that these lesions are sometimes treated more vigorously than is necessary, I doubt that very many exenterations have been done for them. On the other hand, I know that many have been performed after a diagnosis of cancerous melanosis has been made. A genuine malignant melanoma arising in an area of acquired melanosis of the conjunctiva carries a poor prognosis, and I will not quarrel here with those who believe that

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1966

There are no references for this article.