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Crisis in Medical Communication

Crisis in Medical Communication Abstract THE WORLD now has nearly 6,000 medical journals, with an annual increase of about 100, containing a total of around 2 million printed pages a year. So much is printed in so many places that mere publication of a new fact or idea does not by any means ensure that it will reach all or most of those who need it in their practice or researches. This crisis in medical communication in England is considered by Sir Theodore Fox,1 retiring after 20 years as editor of Lancet. He divides medical journals in England into two types. One is the "medical recorder" whose function is to record new observations, experiments, and techniques. It is the mouthpiece of the laboratory or clinical investigator who is advancing medical knowledge. As a rule, it is the journal of a specialty. The other type is the "medical news" publication designed for the practitioner to References 1. Fox, T.: Crisis in Communication , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1965. 2. Garland, J.: Crisis in Medical Communication , Med World News 6:122 ( (Oct 22) ) 1965. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Crisis in Medical Communication

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 83 (6) – Jun 1, 1966

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1966.00760020517004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE WORLD now has nearly 6,000 medical journals, with an annual increase of about 100, containing a total of around 2 million printed pages a year. So much is printed in so many places that mere publication of a new fact or idea does not by any means ensure that it will reach all or most of those who need it in their practice or researches. This crisis in medical communication in England is considered by Sir Theodore Fox,1 retiring after 20 years as editor of Lancet. He divides medical journals in England into two types. One is the "medical recorder" whose function is to record new observations, experiments, and techniques. It is the mouthpiece of the laboratory or clinical investigator who is advancing medical knowledge. As a rule, it is the journal of a specialty. The other type is the "medical news" publication designed for the practitioner to References 1. Fox, T.: Crisis in Communication , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1965. 2. Garland, J.: Crisis in Medical Communication , Med World News 6:122 ( (Oct 22) ) 1965.

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1966

References