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Creating a Healthier Future Through Early Interventions for Children

Creating a Healthier Future Through Early Interventions for Children COMMENTARY Creating a Healthier Future Through Early Interventions for Children health risks such as smoking and health problems such James A. Mercy, PhD as obesity, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and sexually Janet Saul, PhD transmitted diseases. These exposures pose a substantial risk for short- and long- OLICY MAKERS HAVE WIDELY ENDORSED THE IDEA THAT term health through several mechanisms. For instance, educational and economic achievement are a func- chronic exposure to stress can accumulate and lead to po- tion of early childhood experience and develop- tentially irreversible changes in the interrelated brain cir- Pment and can be improved through interventions cuits and hormonal systems that regulate stress (eg, 1,2 such as preschool. However, they have yet to fully em- sympathetic-adrenomedullary system, hypothalamic- 3-5 brace that adolescent and adult health is also profoundly pituitary-adrenocortical system). These exposures also in- affected by early childhood experiences and can similarly crease the risk of engaging in health risk behaviors such as be improved through wise public investments. Neurobio- smoking, substance abuse, overeating, and unsafe sexual be- logical, behavioral, and social science research conclu- haviors associated with a variety of long-term adverse health sively shows that early adverse experiences can affect brain outcomes. Exposure http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Creating a Healthier Future Through Early Interventions for Children

JAMA , Volume 301 (21) – Jun 3, 2009

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2009 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2009.803
pmid
19491188
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMMENTARY Creating a Healthier Future Through Early Interventions for Children health risks such as smoking and health problems such James A. Mercy, PhD as obesity, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and sexually Janet Saul, PhD transmitted diseases. These exposures pose a substantial risk for short- and long- OLICY MAKERS HAVE WIDELY ENDORSED THE IDEA THAT term health through several mechanisms. For instance, educational and economic achievement are a func- chronic exposure to stress can accumulate and lead to po- tion of early childhood experience and develop- tentially irreversible changes in the interrelated brain cir- Pment and can be improved through interventions cuits and hormonal systems that regulate stress (eg, 1,2 such as preschool. However, they have yet to fully em- sympathetic-adrenomedullary system, hypothalamic- 3-5 brace that adolescent and adult health is also profoundly pituitary-adrenocortical system). These exposures also in- affected by early childhood experiences and can similarly crease the risk of engaging in health risk behaviors such as be improved through wise public investments. Neurobio- smoking, substance abuse, overeating, and unsafe sexual be- logical, behavioral, and social science research conclu- haviors associated with a variety of long-term adverse health sively shows that early adverse experiences can affect brain outcomes. Exposure

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 3, 2009

References