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Corrugated Arteries: Fixed Pathology or Functional Alteration?

Corrugated Arteries: Fixed Pathology or Functional Alteration? Abstract Corrugated arteries, stationary waves, standing arterial waves, or arterial rippling are all terms which describe the unusual appearance of regular, periodic, symmetric transverse striations in the contrast column in medium-sized muscular arteries at angiography (Figure). They are a phenomenon which various reports have described and attempted to explain. At present four main theories deserve consideration and scrutiny. The phenomenon was first recognized in the femoral arteries and discussed by Wickbom and Bartley1 in a report in 1957 on complications of catheter angiography. These authors reasoned that the phenomenon was caused by circular muscle spasm, because it disappeared when tolazoline (Priscoline) hydrochloride was administered. Subsequent reports described corrugated arteries in the internal carotid, radial, splenic, superior mesenteric, and renal arteries, and proposed other explanations. Theander2 favored a fluid-mechanical theory. He postulated that pulse-pressure waves, generated by the heart and forced through the arterial tree, are reflected at branching points References 1. Wickbom I, Bartley O: Arterial "spasm" inperipheral arteriography using the catheter method . Acta Radiol 47:433, 1957.Crossref 2. Theander G: Arteriographic demonstration of stationary arterial waves . Acta Radiol 53:417, 1960.Crossref 3. Mayall GF: A model for the study of stationary arterial waves . Clin Radiol 17:84, 1966.Crossref 4. Papadopoulos C, Paegle RD: Corrugated arteries . J Cardiovasc Surg 11:188, 1970. 5. Warren R, John HT, Shepherd RC, et al: Studies on patients with arteriosclerotic obliterative disease of the femoral artery . Surg 49:1-13, 1961. 6. Foster JH, Killen DA, Klatte E: Corrugated arteries: An enigma . Amer Surg 34:398, 1968. 7. New PFJ: Arterial stationary waves . Amer J Radiol 97:488, 1966. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Corrugated Arteries: Fixed Pathology or Functional Alteration?

Archives of Surgery , Volume 104 (1) – Jan 1, 1972

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1972.04180010012002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Corrugated arteries, stationary waves, standing arterial waves, or arterial rippling are all terms which describe the unusual appearance of regular, periodic, symmetric transverse striations in the contrast column in medium-sized muscular arteries at angiography (Figure). They are a phenomenon which various reports have described and attempted to explain. At present four main theories deserve consideration and scrutiny. The phenomenon was first recognized in the femoral arteries and discussed by Wickbom and Bartley1 in a report in 1957 on complications of catheter angiography. These authors reasoned that the phenomenon was caused by circular muscle spasm, because it disappeared when tolazoline (Priscoline) hydrochloride was administered. Subsequent reports described corrugated arteries in the internal carotid, radial, splenic, superior mesenteric, and renal arteries, and proposed other explanations. Theander2 favored a fluid-mechanical theory. He postulated that pulse-pressure waves, generated by the heart and forced through the arterial tree, are reflected at branching points References 1. Wickbom I, Bartley O: Arterial "spasm" inperipheral arteriography using the catheter method . Acta Radiol 47:433, 1957.Crossref 2. Theander G: Arteriographic demonstration of stationary arterial waves . Acta Radiol 53:417, 1960.Crossref 3. Mayall GF: A model for the study of stationary arterial waves . Clin Radiol 17:84, 1966.Crossref 4. Papadopoulos C, Paegle RD: Corrugated arteries . J Cardiovasc Surg 11:188, 1970. 5. Warren R, John HT, Shepherd RC, et al: Studies on patients with arteriosclerotic obliterative disease of the femoral artery . Surg 49:1-13, 1961. 6. Foster JH, Killen DA, Klatte E: Corrugated arteries: An enigma . Amer Surg 34:398, 1968. 7. New PFJ: Arterial stationary waves . Amer J Radiol 97:488, 1966.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1972

References