Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Correlation of Filtered, Band - Limited White Noise and the Speech Reception Threshold

Correlation of Filtered, Band - Limited White Noise and the Speech Reception Threshold Abstract Although of varied form and in wide use, speech reception tests have their drawbacks. The following research was directed toward investigating and eliminating some of these negative aspects. Speech reception testing evaluates the over-all hearing function, not just the sensory capacity of the ear to perceive sounds of various frequencies and intensities. Therefore, such cortical processes as synthesis, analysis, discrimination, cluster (guessing at the meaning from the relation of the various parts), memory, fatigue, effort, and language ability affect the outcome of any speech test in a manner which is nonpredictable today. Also, intertest validity suffers from factors governed by regional dialect, voice quality differences, articulation differences, etc., on the part of the tester. Speech reception test elements are, by nature, heterogeneous. This means that no two words are exactly alike, and, as a result, we must not expect the listener to just hear all words at the same intensity. References 1. Brogden, W. J., and Miller, G. A.: Physiological Noise Generated under Earphone Cushions , J. Acoust. Soc. America 19:620-623, 1947.Crossref 2. Carhart, R.: Speech Reception in Relation to Pattern of Pure Tone Loss , J. Speech Disorders 11:97-108, 1946. 3. Dunn, H. K., and White, S. D.: Statistical Measurements on Conversational Speech , J. Acoust. Soc. America 11:278-288, 1940.Crossref 4. Egan, J. P.: Articulation Testing Methods , Laryngoscope 58:955-991, 1948.Crossref 5. Falconer, G. A., and Davis, H.: The Intelligibility of Connected Discourse as a Test for the Threshold of Speech , Laryngoscope 57:581-595, 1947.Crossref 6. Fletcher, H.: A Method of Calculating Hearing for Speech from an Audiogram , Acta otolaryng. , (Supp. 90) , pp. 26-37, 1950. 7. Hayes, C. S., and Butler, R. A.: Correlation Between Clicks and Speech Reception Tests, paper read before the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, St. Louis, Oct., 1954. 8. Hirsh, I. J.: The Measurement of Hearing , New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1952. 9. Silverman, S. R.: Use of Speech Tests for Evaluation of Clinical Procedures , Arch. Otolaryng. 51:786-797, 1950.Crossref 10. Thurlow, W. R.: Statistical Studies of Auditory Tests in Relation to the Fenestration Operation , Laryngoscope 58:43-66, 1948.Crossref 11. Wever, E. G., and Lawrence, M.: Physiological Acoustics , Princeton, N. J., Princeton University Press, 1954. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Correlation of Filtered, Band - Limited White Noise and the Speech Reception Threshold

A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 68 (3) – Sep 1, 1958

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/correlation-of-filtered-band-limited-white-noise-and-the-speech-YsD1CS7ytz
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1958 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6894
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1958.00730020384013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Although of varied form and in wide use, speech reception tests have their drawbacks. The following research was directed toward investigating and eliminating some of these negative aspects. Speech reception testing evaluates the over-all hearing function, not just the sensory capacity of the ear to perceive sounds of various frequencies and intensities. Therefore, such cortical processes as synthesis, analysis, discrimination, cluster (guessing at the meaning from the relation of the various parts), memory, fatigue, effort, and language ability affect the outcome of any speech test in a manner which is nonpredictable today. Also, intertest validity suffers from factors governed by regional dialect, voice quality differences, articulation differences, etc., on the part of the tester. Speech reception test elements are, by nature, heterogeneous. This means that no two words are exactly alike, and, as a result, we must not expect the listener to just hear all words at the same intensity. References 1. Brogden, W. J., and Miller, G. A.: Physiological Noise Generated under Earphone Cushions , J. Acoust. Soc. America 19:620-623, 1947.Crossref 2. Carhart, R.: Speech Reception in Relation to Pattern of Pure Tone Loss , J. Speech Disorders 11:97-108, 1946. 3. Dunn, H. K., and White, S. D.: Statistical Measurements on Conversational Speech , J. Acoust. Soc. America 11:278-288, 1940.Crossref 4. Egan, J. P.: Articulation Testing Methods , Laryngoscope 58:955-991, 1948.Crossref 5. Falconer, G. A., and Davis, H.: The Intelligibility of Connected Discourse as a Test for the Threshold of Speech , Laryngoscope 57:581-595, 1947.Crossref 6. Fletcher, H.: A Method of Calculating Hearing for Speech from an Audiogram , Acta otolaryng. , (Supp. 90) , pp. 26-37, 1950. 7. Hayes, C. S., and Butler, R. A.: Correlation Between Clicks and Speech Reception Tests, paper read before the meeting of the American Speech and Hearing Association, St. Louis, Oct., 1954. 8. Hirsh, I. J.: The Measurement of Hearing , New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1952. 9. Silverman, S. R.: Use of Speech Tests for Evaluation of Clinical Procedures , Arch. Otolaryng. 51:786-797, 1950.Crossref 10. Thurlow, W. R.: Statistical Studies of Auditory Tests in Relation to the Fenestration Operation , Laryngoscope 58:43-66, 1948.Crossref 11. Wever, E. G., and Lawrence, M.: Physiological Acoustics , Princeton, N. J., Princeton University Press, 1954.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1958

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month