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Controlled Cavity Healing After Mastoid and Fenestration Operations

Controlled Cavity Healing After Mastoid and Fenestration Operations Abstract Prompt, complete, spontaneous coverage of the postoperative mastoidectomy, tympanoplasty, or fenestration cavity by a continuous sheet of healthy keratinized squamous epithelium is the ideal result desired by the otologic surgeon. However, several factors may prevent the attainment of this goal. We know that incomplete epidermization of the cavity, recurrent contamination, and aural drainage are relatively common occurrences. Adequate and proper postoperative treatment will salvage some of these cavities and complete healing may occur. However, in spite of treatment, a fair proportion of them do not completely heal and recurrent drainage leads to dissatisfaction of the patient, even though an excellent result was otherwise obtained. We maintain that the healing of these cavities can be controlled and postoperative purulent aural drainage avoided in the large majority of cases. Our definition of a healed cavity is one that is completely lined by a continuous sheet of keratinized squamous epithelium, as stated in References 1. Guiford, F. R., and Wright, W. K.: Secondary Skin Grafting in Fenestration and Mastoid Cavities , Laryngoscope 64:626-631, 1954. 2. Watkyn-Thomas, F. W., Editor: Diseases of the Throat, Nose and Ear , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1953. 3. Kerrison, P. D.: Diseases of the Ear , Ed. 4, Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott Company, 1930. 4. Singleton, J. D.: Pneumatization of the Adult Temporal Bone, The Mastoid Portion: An Anatomic and Clinical Study , Laryngoscope 54:324-344, 1944.Crossref 5. Padgett, E. C.: Skin Grafting , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1942. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Controlled Cavity Healing After Mastoid and Fenestration Operations

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6894
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1960.03770020037008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Prompt, complete, spontaneous coverage of the postoperative mastoidectomy, tympanoplasty, or fenestration cavity by a continuous sheet of healthy keratinized squamous epithelium is the ideal result desired by the otologic surgeon. However, several factors may prevent the attainment of this goal. We know that incomplete epidermization of the cavity, recurrent contamination, and aural drainage are relatively common occurrences. Adequate and proper postoperative treatment will salvage some of these cavities and complete healing may occur. However, in spite of treatment, a fair proportion of them do not completely heal and recurrent drainage leads to dissatisfaction of the patient, even though an excellent result was otherwise obtained. We maintain that the healing of these cavities can be controlled and postoperative purulent aural drainage avoided in the large majority of cases. Our definition of a healed cavity is one that is completely lined by a continuous sheet of keratinized squamous epithelium, as stated in References 1. Guiford, F. R., and Wright, W. K.: Secondary Skin Grafting in Fenestration and Mastoid Cavities , Laryngoscope 64:626-631, 1954. 2. Watkyn-Thomas, F. W., Editor: Diseases of the Throat, Nose and Ear , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1953. 3. Kerrison, P. D.: Diseases of the Ear , Ed. 4, Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott Company, 1930. 4. Singleton, J. D.: Pneumatization of the Adult Temporal Bone, The Mastoid Portion: An Anatomic and Clinical Study , Laryngoscope 54:324-344, 1944.Crossref 5. Padgett, E. C.: Skin Grafting , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1942.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1960

References