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Continuous Patient Engagement in Comparative Effectiveness Research

Continuous Patient Engagement in Comparative Effectiveness Research VIEWPOINT Continuous Patient Engagement in Comparative Effectiveness Research collection tool, and participate in pilot testing survey items. C. Daniel Mullins, PhD Traditionally, patient feedback is infrequently used during Abdulla M. Abdulhalim, BSPharm the development of the analysis plan. However, this frame- Danielle C. Lavallee, PharmD, PhD work proposes that patients could assist in helping to define or categorize variables even if they do not have training in HE GOAL OF COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS RESEARCH research methods. When reviewing and interpreting results, (CER) is to provide patients, their advocates and care- patients could reflect on whether results are plausible and be- givers, health care professionals, federal officials, policy lievable, what other factors should be considered, and how Tmakers, and payers with evidence-based informa- results may vary across subgroups of patients. 1,2 tion to make informed health care decisions. Previously, CER In the translation phase, patients could identify which re- studies were designed by researchers and had relatively little sults are easy or difficult to understand. If the results do not input from patients. Patient engagement has rapidly gained affect patients or are counterintuitive, CER findings will not acceptance as crucial to the successful translation of CER for be translated into medical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Continuous Patient Engagement in Comparative Effectiveness Research

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2012.442
pmid
22511684
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

VIEWPOINT Continuous Patient Engagement in Comparative Effectiveness Research collection tool, and participate in pilot testing survey items. C. Daniel Mullins, PhD Traditionally, patient feedback is infrequently used during Abdulla M. Abdulhalim, BSPharm the development of the analysis plan. However, this frame- Danielle C. Lavallee, PharmD, PhD work proposes that patients could assist in helping to define or categorize variables even if they do not have training in HE GOAL OF COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS RESEARCH research methods. When reviewing and interpreting results, (CER) is to provide patients, their advocates and care- patients could reflect on whether results are plausible and be- givers, health care professionals, federal officials, policy lievable, what other factors should be considered, and how Tmakers, and payers with evidence-based informa- results may vary across subgroups of patients. 1,2 tion to make informed health care decisions. Previously, CER In the translation phase, patients could identify which re- studies were designed by researchers and had relatively little sults are easy or difficult to understand. If the results do not input from patients. Patient engagement has rapidly gained affect patients or are counterintuitive, CER findings will not acceptance as crucial to the successful translation of CER for be translated into medical

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 18, 2012

References