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Contemporary Trends in Dyslipidemia in the Framingham Heart Study

Contemporary Trends in Dyslipidemia in the Framingham Heart Study ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Contemporary Trends in Dyslipidemia in the Framingham Heart Study Erik Ingelsson, MD, PhD; Joseph M. Massaro, PhD; Patrice Sutherland, BS; Paul F. Jacques, DSc; Daniel Levy, MD; Ralph B. D’Agostino, PhD; Ramachandran S. Vasan, MD; Sander J. Robins, MD Background: Recent cross-sectional population studies 46.6 mg/dL in men; 56.9 and 60.1 mg/dL in women; in the United States have shown an increase in obesity, a P value for trend, P.001 in both sexes), whereas levels decrease in cholesterol values, but no changes in levels of of TG were decreased (144.5 and 134.1 mg/dL in men; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or triglyc- 122.3 and 112.3 mg/dL in women; P value for trend, P= .004 in men and.001 in women). Over the same time erides (TG). interval, BMI (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) increased (27.8 and 28.5 in Methods: Plasma total cholesterol, HDL-C, and TG lev- men; 27.0 and 27.6 in women; P value for trend, P .001 els, measured by the same methods at the 3 most re- in men and P = .001 in women). There was an inverse re- cently completed examinations of Framingham Off- lationship between changes in BMI http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2009 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/archinternmed.2008.561
pmid
19204219
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Contemporary Trends in Dyslipidemia in the Framingham Heart Study Erik Ingelsson, MD, PhD; Joseph M. Massaro, PhD; Patrice Sutherland, BS; Paul F. Jacques, DSc; Daniel Levy, MD; Ralph B. D’Agostino, PhD; Ramachandran S. Vasan, MD; Sander J. Robins, MD Background: Recent cross-sectional population studies 46.6 mg/dL in men; 56.9 and 60.1 mg/dL in women; in the United States have shown an increase in obesity, a P value for trend, P.001 in both sexes), whereas levels decrease in cholesterol values, but no changes in levels of of TG were decreased (144.5 and 134.1 mg/dL in men; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or triglyc- 122.3 and 112.3 mg/dL in women; P value for trend, P= .004 in men and.001 in women). Over the same time erides (TG). interval, BMI (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) increased (27.8 and 28.5 in Methods: Plasma total cholesterol, HDL-C, and TG lev- men; 27.0 and 27.6 in women; P value for trend, P .001 els, measured by the same methods at the 3 most re- in men and P = .001 in women). There was an inverse re- cently completed examinations of Framingham Off- lationship between changes in BMI

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 9, 2009

References