Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

CONTEMPORARY THERAPY OF THE MENOPAUSAL SYNDROME

CONTEMPORARY THERAPY OF THE MENOPAUSAL SYNDROME Therapy for the postmenopausal patient has three aspects: psychotherapy, sedation, and hormonal therapy. A convenient index (menopausal index) for expressing the status of a patient is calculated by assigning to each of the 11 most common symptoms a weight factor and a severity coefficient; the sum of the 11 products ranges from 0 (for complete absence of menopausal symptoms) to about 35 (for serious distress). It was used as a criterion in comparing the efficacy of 27 types of treatment, including use of conjugated equine estrogens (299 cases), ethinyl estradiol (284 cases), and chlorotrianisene (124 cases). There are objections to the prolonged use of barbiturates, and the results obtained by the use of ataractic drugs alone in this study were but slightly better than those obtained with a placebo. Superior results were obtained with conjugated equine estrogens and ethinyl estradiol alone or when the latter was used with androgens. These effects were augmented with the addition of a phenothiazine compound to the estrogen-androgen combination. The judicious use of such therapy can afford relief from unnecessary discomfort to the everincreasing number of menopausal women in the population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

CONTEMPORARY THERAPY OF THE MENOPAUSAL SYNDROME

JAMA , Volume 171 (12) – Nov 21, 1959

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/contemporary-therapy-of-the-menopausal-syndrome-fx0LfubsmK
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03010300001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Therapy for the postmenopausal patient has three aspects: psychotherapy, sedation, and hormonal therapy. A convenient index (menopausal index) for expressing the status of a patient is calculated by assigning to each of the 11 most common symptoms a weight factor and a severity coefficient; the sum of the 11 products ranges from 0 (for complete absence of menopausal symptoms) to about 35 (for serious distress). It was used as a criterion in comparing the efficacy of 27 types of treatment, including use of conjugated equine estrogens (299 cases), ethinyl estradiol (284 cases), and chlorotrianisene (124 cases). There are objections to the prolonged use of barbiturates, and the results obtained by the use of ataractic drugs alone in this study were but slightly better than those obtained with a placebo. Superior results were obtained with conjugated equine estrogens and ethinyl estradiol alone or when the latter was used with androgens. These effects were augmented with the addition of a phenothiazine compound to the estrogen-androgen combination. The judicious use of such therapy can afford relief from unnecessary discomfort to the everincreasing number of menopausal women in the population.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 21, 1959

There are no references for this article.