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Contact Urticaria due to Sensitivity to Spray Starch

Contact Urticaria due to Sensitivity to Spray Starch Abstract Occasionally, agents that are applied to the skin produce an immediate wheal-and-flare reaction rather than the usual delayed-type hypersensitivity dermatitis. Open tests that are observed for 30 minutes detect the urticarial reaction, whereas standard closed patch tests that are removed after 48 hours are negative. In this article, we report contact urticaria due to sensitivity to formaldehyde and terpinyl acetate, which are found in a commercial spray starch. Report of a Case A 20-year-old woman had a one-year history of pruritus and hives that occurred within minutes of wearing spray-starched clothes. New "wash-and-wear" clothes produced similar symptoms, but washed, unstarched clothes were worn without difficulty. Personal and family histories were negative for atopy. Open tests were applied at different times to her forearm and back with the commercial spray starch and its ingredients (Table). Within 15 minutes, urticaria was observed resulting from the spray starch, formaldehyde, and perfume. Further testing References 1. Maibach HI, Johnson HL: Contact urticaria syndrome: Contact urticaria to diethyltoluamide (immediate-type hypersensitivity) . Arch Dermatol 111:726-730, 1975.Crossref 2. Fisher AA: Contact Dermatitis . Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger Publishers, 1973, pp 283-286. 3. Helander I: Contact urticaria from leather containing formaldehyde . Arch Dermatol 113:1443, 1977.Crossref 4. Larsen WG: Perfume dermatitis: A study of 20 patients . Arch Dermatol 113:623-626, 1977.Crossref 5. Opdyke DLJ: Terpinyl acetate . Food Cosmet Toxicol 12:999-1000, 1974.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Contact Urticaria due to Sensitivity to Spray Starch

Contact Urticaria due to Sensitivity to Spray Starch

Abstract

Abstract Occasionally, agents that are applied to the skin produce an immediate wheal-and-flare reaction rather than the usual delayed-type hypersensitivity dermatitis. Open tests that are observed for 30 minutes detect the urticarial reaction, whereas standard closed patch tests that are removed after 48 hours are negative. In this article, we report contact urticaria due to sensitivity to formaldehyde and terpinyl acetate, which are found in a commercial spray starch. Report of a Case A...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1979.04010050058024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Occasionally, agents that are applied to the skin produce an immediate wheal-and-flare reaction rather than the usual delayed-type hypersensitivity dermatitis. Open tests that are observed for 30 minutes detect the urticarial reaction, whereas standard closed patch tests that are removed after 48 hours are negative. In this article, we report contact urticaria due to sensitivity to formaldehyde and terpinyl acetate, which are found in a commercial spray starch. Report of a Case A 20-year-old woman had a one-year history of pruritus and hives that occurred within minutes of wearing spray-starched clothes. New "wash-and-wear" clothes produced similar symptoms, but washed, unstarched clothes were worn without difficulty. Personal and family histories were negative for atopy. Open tests were applied at different times to her forearm and back with the commercial spray starch and its ingredients (Table). Within 15 minutes, urticaria was observed resulting from the spray starch, formaldehyde, and perfume. Further testing References 1. Maibach HI, Johnson HL: Contact urticaria syndrome: Contact urticaria to diethyltoluamide (immediate-type hypersensitivity) . Arch Dermatol 111:726-730, 1975.Crossref 2. Fisher AA: Contact Dermatitis . Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger Publishers, 1973, pp 283-286. 3. Helander I: Contact urticaria from leather containing formaldehyde . Arch Dermatol 113:1443, 1977.Crossref 4. Larsen WG: Perfume dermatitis: A study of 20 patients . Arch Dermatol 113:623-626, 1977.Crossref 5. Opdyke DLJ: Terpinyl acetate . Food Cosmet Toxicol 12:999-1000, 1974.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1979

References

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