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CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT OF INTESTINAL OCCLUSION BY INTERNAL ELECTRICITY.

CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT OF INTESTINAL OCCLUSION BY INTERNAL ELECTRICITY. In reviewing the different means of relief recommended and practised by American medical men for the cure of intestinal obstruction, the investigator is led to believe that what is regarded in some of the European medical centers as safe, successful, not interfering with the employment of the more radical procedure—laparotomy—is entirely ignored, or in fact, not even considered here. From a fair amount of investigation of the subject I am convinced that the American practitioner is neglecting to employ therapeutic means that have been satisfactory for years to many of the most eminent men of Europe. The physician who is called to see a patient, whose most prominent symptom is one of non-movement of the bowels, may have a very obscure but serious case to contend with. Cathartics and enemas have been ineffectual, so it is a case of obstruction. What is to be done? A surgical operation may be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT OF INTESTINAL OCCLUSION BY INTERNAL ELECTRICITY.

JAMA , Volume XXXI (17) – Oct 22, 1898

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.92450170024002f
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In reviewing the different means of relief recommended and practised by American medical men for the cure of intestinal obstruction, the investigator is led to believe that what is regarded in some of the European medical centers as safe, successful, not interfering with the employment of the more radical procedure—laparotomy—is entirely ignored, or in fact, not even considered here. From a fair amount of investigation of the subject I am convinced that the American practitioner is neglecting to employ therapeutic means that have been satisfactory for years to many of the most eminent men of Europe. The physician who is called to see a patient, whose most prominent symptom is one of non-movement of the bowels, may have a very obscure but serious case to contend with. Cathartics and enemas have been ineffectual, so it is a case of obstruction. What is to be done? A surgical operation may be

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 22, 1898

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