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CONSCIOUSNESS AND PAIN DURING APPARENT SURGICAL ANESTHESIA

CONSCIOUSNESS AND PAIN DURING APPARENT SURGICAL ANESTHESIA A patient underwent an operation under general anesthesia which included the use of succinylcholine and intravenously given lidocaine, with assisted respiration. After recovery she gave evidence of having been intermittently conscious during the three-hour period of supposed anesthesia and stated that she had suffered extreme pain during much of the operation. An awareness that such an extreme in pain reflex threshold may rarely exist in patients undergoing operative procedures should caution us to be more appreciative of the subtle signs suggesting an inadequate state of anesthesia. This is particularly applicable when respiratory reflexes and other types of response are obviated by the use of neuromuscular blocking agents. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

CONSCIOUSNESS AND PAIN DURING APPARENT SURGICAL ANESTHESIA

JAMA , Volume 170 (17) – Aug 22, 1959

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03010170031007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A patient underwent an operation under general anesthesia which included the use of succinylcholine and intravenously given lidocaine, with assisted respiration. After recovery she gave evidence of having been intermittently conscious during the three-hour period of supposed anesthesia and stated that she had suffered extreme pain during much of the operation. An awareness that such an extreme in pain reflex threshold may rarely exist in patients undergoing operative procedures should caution us to be more appreciative of the subtle signs suggesting an inadequate state of anesthesia. This is particularly applicable when respiratory reflexes and other types of response are obviated by the use of neuromuscular blocking agents.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 22, 1959

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