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Congenital Varicella

Congenital Varicella Abstract Newborn infants are passively protected against certain viral diseases by transplacental transmission of immune antibodies. Ehrlich,1 in his study of antitoxin immunity to ricin, showed that passive transfer from immune mothers to their offspring occurs naturally. This transfer has been demonstrated by neutralization tests for poliomyelitis2 and for influenza, yellow fever, smallpox, and cowpox vaccine.3 Laboratory tests are not available for the transmission of antibodies for the virus of chickenpox. Clinical observation suggests that there is transplacental transmission of immune antibodies against varicella. Most mothers have had this disease before they become pregnant. Its occurrence is rare in young infants. The records of Willard Parker Hospital in New York show that among 2200 admissions of patients of all ages for varicella during a three year period there was only 1 case of chickenpox in a newborn infant (0.05%) and only 46 cases in the age group from References 1. Ehrlich, P., cited by McKinley, E. B. in Gay, F. P. et al.: Agents of Disease and Host Resistance , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1953, p. 457. 2. Aycock, W. L., and Kramer, S. D.: J. Exper. Med. 52:457, 1930.Crossref 3. Gay, F. P. et al.: Agents of Disease and Host Resistance , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1953. 4. T. W. Hubbard: Brit. M. J. 1:822, 1878. 5. Pridham, F. C.: Brit. M. J. 1:1054, 1913.Crossref 6. Mitchell, A. G., and Fletcher, E. G.: J. A. M. A. 89:279, 1927.Crossref 7. Cosgrave, A. K., and Samuel, J.: Malayan M. J. 9:68, 1934. 8. Mitchell, G. A.: Personal communication to H. H. Shuman , Am. J. Dis. Child. 58:568, 1939. 9. Shuman, H. H.: Am. J. Dis. Child. 58:564, 1939. 10. Caravia Vera: Semana méd . 1:377, 1948. 11. Middlecamp, N. J.: J. Pediat. 43:573, 1953.Crossref 12. Odessky, L.; Newman, B., and Weiss, G. B.: New York J. Med. 54:2849, 1954. 13. Waddington, H. K.: Obst. & Gynec. 7:319, 1956. 14. Oppenheimer, H.: Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 74:240, 1944. 15. Baron, F.: Nourrison 23:157, 1935. 16. Henderson, W. B.: J. Pediat. 4:668, 1934. 17. Lucchesi, J. C.; La Boccetta, A. C., and Peale, A. R.: Am. J. Dis. Child. 73:44, 1947. 18. Hoyne, A. L., in Brenneman's Practice of Pediatrics , edited by I. McQuarrie, Hagerstown, Md., W. F. Prior Company, Inc., 1957, Vol. 2, Chap. 3 , p. 1. 19. Mössmer, E., Kinderärztl. Praxis 19:169, 1951. 20. Apert, E. M., Bull. méd. Paris 9:827, 1895. 21. Lereboullet, Rev. gen. clin. thérap 51:97, 1937. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1958 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6916
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1958.02060060732015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Newborn infants are passively protected against certain viral diseases by transplacental transmission of immune antibodies. Ehrlich,1 in his study of antitoxin immunity to ricin, showed that passive transfer from immune mothers to their offspring occurs naturally. This transfer has been demonstrated by neutralization tests for poliomyelitis2 and for influenza, yellow fever, smallpox, and cowpox vaccine.3 Laboratory tests are not available for the transmission of antibodies for the virus of chickenpox. Clinical observation suggests that there is transplacental transmission of immune antibodies against varicella. Most mothers have had this disease before they become pregnant. Its occurrence is rare in young infants. The records of Willard Parker Hospital in New York show that among 2200 admissions of patients of all ages for varicella during a three year period there was only 1 case of chickenpox in a newborn infant (0.05%) and only 46 cases in the age group from References 1. Ehrlich, P., cited by McKinley, E. B. in Gay, F. P. et al.: Agents of Disease and Host Resistance , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1953, p. 457. 2. Aycock, W. L., and Kramer, S. D.: J. Exper. Med. 52:457, 1930.Crossref 3. Gay, F. P. et al.: Agents of Disease and Host Resistance , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1953. 4. T. W. Hubbard: Brit. M. J. 1:822, 1878. 5. Pridham, F. C.: Brit. M. J. 1:1054, 1913.Crossref 6. Mitchell, A. G., and Fletcher, E. G.: J. A. M. A. 89:279, 1927.Crossref 7. Cosgrave, A. K., and Samuel, J.: Malayan M. J. 9:68, 1934. 8. Mitchell, G. A.: Personal communication to H. H. Shuman , Am. J. Dis. Child. 58:568, 1939. 9. Shuman, H. H.: Am. J. Dis. Child. 58:564, 1939. 10. Caravia Vera: Semana méd . 1:377, 1948. 11. Middlecamp, N. J.: J. Pediat. 43:573, 1953.Crossref 12. Odessky, L.; Newman, B., and Weiss, G. B.: New York J. Med. 54:2849, 1954. 13. Waddington, H. K.: Obst. & Gynec. 7:319, 1956. 14. Oppenheimer, H.: Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 74:240, 1944. 15. Baron, F.: Nourrison 23:157, 1935. 16. Henderson, W. B.: J. Pediat. 4:668, 1934. 17. Lucchesi, J. C.; La Boccetta, A. C., and Peale, A. R.: Am. J. Dis. Child. 73:44, 1947. 18. Hoyne, A. L., in Brenneman's Practice of Pediatrics , edited by I. McQuarrie, Hagerstown, Md., W. F. Prior Company, Inc., 1957, Vol. 2, Chap. 3 , p. 1. 19. Mössmer, E., Kinderärztl. Praxis 19:169, 1951. 20. Apert, E. M., Bull. méd. Paris 9:827, 1895. 21. Lereboullet, Rev. gen. clin. thérap 51:97, 1937.

Journal

A.M.A. Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1958

References